Twitter takes security measures after ‘rogue’ employee disables Donald Trump’s account

Twitter takes security measures after ‘rogue’ employee disables Donald Trump’s account
After President Donald Trump’s Twitter account was disabled for 11 minutes, Twitter said it had implemented safeguards to prevent such an incident from happening again. Trump has continued to tweet from Air Force One en route to Asia.

In a tweet Friday, the company said it would not share all the details of its investigation or updates on their security measure, “but we take this seriously and our teams are on it.”

Twitter faced questions about its internal security after someone briefly deactivated Trump’s personal account on Thursday evening.

READ MORE: Trump’s Twitter taken down by outgoing employee

Though the company initially said the incident was “inadvertent” and caused by “human error,” details that emerged several hours later indicated it had been intentional. Twitter said that the employee responsible was working their last day with the company, in the customer support sector.

"We are conducting a full internal review," Twitter said. In an earlier statement, the social network said it was "taking steps to prevent this from happening again."

The blackout drew widespread attention to the microblogging site. The deactivation was welcomed by some of the president's critics and detractors, who urged Twitter to make it permanent.

Trump's personal account been the subject of multiple protests, particularly since he became president. Some Twitter users blocked by the account have sued in court, demanding access to the account's tweets, which have been deemed official public statements.

Others on Twitter have called Trump's fiery rhetoric against North Korea a violation of the social network's terms of service, which prohibit threats of violence.

“My Twitter account was taken down for 11 minutes by a rogue employee,” Trump said on n Friday, tweeting, “I guess the word must finally be getting out - and having an impact.”

It is unknown how many Twitter employees have the authority to delete accounts or tamper with them in other ways, such as sending bogus tweets, Reuters reported.

The “rogue” employee may actually have been a contractor. The New York Times reported that Twitter relies on large divisions of contract workers to handle sensitive work, using third party services like ProUnlimited and Cognizant, “which are essentially internet call centers staffed with hundreds of workers who deal with customer issues.”