US Congress flounders over healthcare repeal

The US economy continues to struggle and the national debt is soaring, but Americans politicians continue to focus their time on a frivolous repeal of the Obama healthcare bill they know will fail.

Christina Bellantoni, the associate political editor at Roll Call explained the proposed repeal of the healthcare bill is an attempt by Republicans to lay down markets and offer a symbolic gesture to their supporters who oppose the Obama healthcare policy.

It’s all a bunch of theater,” she explained. “Nothing has really changed in Washington.”

Libertarian writer and WorldNetDaily columnist Ilana Mercer disagreed, arguing she believes there is a chance for a positive outcome from the proposed repeal.

We’ve had a bloodbath of a midterm election and it has returned a Congress with a very different composition and a very different mandate,” Mercer commented. “They [Republicans] are saying that they have the support of the voters for repealing this monstrosity.

The attempt at repeal by the Republican Party is a sign they plan to serve in Congress on a mandate of upholding rights, she argued. The repeal will pass the House and likely stall in the Senate, but there is a chance of passage if more conservative Democrats change their votes.

Polls show most Americans would not agree,” remarked Bellantoni. “They basically say they like multiple elements of this healthcare bill. When you call it Barack Obama’s healthcare plan, it remains largely divided. Most of the country think it’s ok, a slightly lower number think it is not ok. But when you actually look at what it does, people like it, which is why the Republicans, they don’t want this to pass either and President Obama would obviously veto it.

The role of the politician is to fight for the good of the country and serve the interests of the rights of the people.

They are supposed to uphold the Constitution and The bill of Rights,” Mercer said. “Our elected representatives are not supposed to represent an unadulterated majority.”

She argued partisan politics have their place when politicians are fighting to uphold rights and principles, including the battle to repeal the healthcare bill and early opposition the invasion of Iraq.

Bellantoni explained partisan politics forces Congress to accomplish very little. Politicians campaign on big actions and changes, but when they get to Washington they do very little and in many cases do exactly what they promised not to do – including raising the national debt ceiling.

They are also going to spend an enormous amount of time naming post offices and honoring local heroes,” she added. “That’s still the majority of what the Congress does, particularly in a divided government.”

Major changes to American policy took place in phases, Bellantoni explained. Major changes took place over years, piece by piece, from civil rights to the more recent healthcare legislations. Major changes rarely take place all at once. Congress is not currently addressing the issues that are pertinent to advancing the nation.