Moscow bombing compels NYPD to beef up security measures

Condolences and tributes for the victims of the Moscow Metro terrorist attack have been pouring into Russia from around the world.

US President Barack Obama telephoned Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to say that Russians and Americans stand together against extremism and violence.

NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen said that there could be no justification for such aggression against innocent people. The alliance has suggested stepping up joint efforts with Russia to fight terrorism.

The European Union and the Council of Europe were also quick to express their anger over the bombings.

Leaders of former Soviet states also sent their condolences to victims' families and the injured.

In America, the attacks in Moscow have stirred up more than just feelings of outrage. The bombings have also led officials to increase security in the belief that they could be the next target.

Patrol shifts on subway stations have doubled. Moreover, the police officers who were patrolling stations overnight, when their shifts ended up in the morning, have been asked to stay on duty.

In addition, so-called critical response vehicles were sent to locations of mass transit. Security presence was also heightened in bus and train stations, as well as on bridges and tunnels. All this comes as a precaution and a response to the terror attacks that took place in Moscow.

The New York City officials have, in fact, considered the possibility of sending detectives to Moscow because the NYPD has representatives in 11 cities overseas whose job is to investigate whether or not someone is plotting an attack against NYC. It is likely such detectives would be sent to Moscow to assess the situation and take part in the investigation.