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Tweets from Assange’s mum fuel conspiracy theory on Clinton email leaks

Tweets from Assange’s mum fuel conspiracy theory on Clinton email leaks
Julian Assange’s mother caused excitement on Twitter, saying an ex-DNC worker leaked the Clinton emails. Christine Assange deleted her post after followers concluded that she meant Seth Rich, who was killed in 2016.

The story unfolded after Christine responded to a tweet claiming Julian Assange had given the then presidential candidate Donald Trump the “upper hand” by leaking the Clinton emails.

Christine replied in the now-removed tweet:

RT

The public apparently deduced from her tweet that she was implying it was the ex-Democratic National Committee (DNC) digital campaigner, Seth Rich, who had been the WikiLeaks source when the party emails were leaked at the height of presidential campaigning in 2016.

The overreaction made Christine delete the tweet saying people were “wrongfully asserting” she was making such admission.

Christine, failed, however, to expand on who she was referring to when she pointed to a “disgruntled” DNC worker. 

Christine doubled down on her denial she was admitting to Rich being WikiLeaks source saying she was merely regurgitating information which was already in the public domain.

She cited former UK ambassador Craig Murray and Veteran Intelligence Professionals for Sanity as sources contradicting US intelligence claims the emails were leaked, not hacked.

Seth Rich was fatally shot in the Bloomingdale neighborhood of Washington, D.C, on July 10, 2016. As the murder came just a week before WikiLeaks published 20,000 emails obtained from the Committee computers via an anonymous source, it spawned conspiracy theories Rich’s death was connected to the leak. The D.C. Metropolitan Police, however, argues the killing was a robbery gone wrong, though nothing was actually stolen.

Moreover, Assange himself spurred claims about Rich being WikiLeaks’ informant after he nodded during an interview when asked if the former NRC worker was their source.

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