'Israel is depressing': Clinton adviser vents frustration in latest Podesta emails

© Carlos Barria
WikiLeaks has dumped another batch of emails from the account of Hillary Clinton’s campaign chair, John Podesta. This is the 21st batch of communications to be released by the whistleblowing site.

There will be a total of 50,000 emails released in the lead up to November 8, according to WikiLeaks. So far, 35,594 have been published.

On Thursday, further discussion among the Clinton campaign of Bill Clinton’s controversial past was revealed, while Clinton adviser Neera Tanden branded the private email server debacle as “f**king insane.”

READ MORE: 'How's this different from Bill Cosby?': Past of Hillary's husband discussed in Podesta emails

Speaking via telephone to a conference in Argentina on Wednesday, Julian Assange claimed the ongoing releases had “whipped up a crazed hornet’s nest atmosphere in the Hillary Clinton campaign.” Assange also claimed that the campaign had attempted to hack the WikiLeaks servers.

READ MORE: Assange claims ‘crazed’ Clinton campaign tried to hack WikiLeaks

Israel is depressing

Clinton adviser Neera Tanden tells Podesta that “Israel is depressing” in a mail from March 18, 2015 titled ‘Man’.

"It's a good lesson that the wing nuts are just ruthless in every country," Tanden adds.

The right-wing Likud Party led by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu won a surprise victory in national elections on the same day, handing him his fourth term in office and making him Israel’s longest-serving prime minister.

"Bad," replies Podesta.

Someone has your password

In March 2016 Podesta is warned to change his email password “immediately” and "ensure that two-factor authentication is turned on" after Charles Delavan, a member of Clinton’s IT team, mails him warning that someone tried to access his account.

“It is absolutely imperative that this is done ASAP,” Delavan tells Podesta’s chief of staff Sara Latham in a second mail stressing the urgency of the issue.

A Google alert on the unauthorized login attempt shows its source as being in Ukraine.

Edward Snowden gang

“That's your Edward Snowdon [sic] gang,” Podesta claims when advised of leaked emails from the Center for American Progress (CAP).

The mail was sent to Podesta by Herbert Sandler, founder of World Savings Bank, which was sold to Wachovia Bank in 2006.

He’s bad bad bad

In an email chain from February 2016, Clinton’s Jewish Outreach Director Sarah Bard mocks Bernie Sanders for his lack of following in Israel. She sends a link to a New York Times article which claims Sanders sought advice from an expert who accused Israel of having ties to a chemical attack.

Media mogul Haim Saban gives his two-cents on the topic, stating that “Bernie Sanders has a 25 year awful record on Israel,” before adding, “THIS is NOTHING.”

“Get your researchers to come up with some of the awful things these 2 (sic) have said about the US/Israel relationship, and you will have plenty of ammunition on the issue,” Saban goes on. “He’s bad bad bad.”

Bernie the megalomaniac

In a separate email to Podesta, Sanders is described as a “Megalomaniac” by philanthropist Philip Munger, who urges Clinton to turn her “financial connections from liability to asset”.

Just days ahead of the Iowa caucus in January 2016, Munger claims: “Bernie relying on charisma and revolution. Megalomaniac!”

Crap that young people pay attention to

In a February 2016 mail Podesta is given advise on Clinton’s campaign by marketing executive Wendy Bronfein, who tells him that Clinton “may not be the best face” to attract younger voters.

Instead she should utilize trending figures in her favor because “that's the crap that young people pay attention to,” Bronfein says.

“I hate to generalize a generation but by social media nature, they 'follow'. So if someone they identify as cool endorses – they will likely fall in line with that candidate.”

Bill Clinton’s “Saxophone moments” are praised by Bronfein as an example of “pop culture play”.

“It's f**king dumb but being 'cool' counts for more than it maybe should,” Bronfein concludes.