Baltimore PD release CCTV video in Freddie Gray case, admit medical care wasn't given

A demonstrator holds a sign in front of the Baltimore Police Department Western District station during a protest against the death in police custody of Freddie Gray in Baltimore April 23, 2015. (Reuters/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)
Baltimore police said Freddie Gray, who died in their custody after being arrested, was not buckled in when he was being transported and that officers “failed to give medical attention in a timely manner multiple times.”

Speaking at a press conference Friday, Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony Batts updated the media about the ongoing investigation. He acknowledged that Gray, who died about a week after suffering a severe spinal cord injury in custody, was never strapped in with a seatbelt as department policy requires.

Deputy Commissioner Kevin Davis added that Baltimore police should have administered medical attention at the site of Gray’s apprehension – presumably because he was already hurt.

Both officials said that if the police officers involved are found to be responsible of a crime, they will be punished.

Batts said that police are currently combing through every CCTV camera that could have possibly captured moments from the chase and arrest. Much of that footage was released later on Friday.

Police published a total of 16 videos were published on YouTube, each one capturing various parts of the area near where Gray was arrested.

The videos don't reveal much about the incident, though officials did single one of them out and have asked residents for help in identifying an individual. The person in question was described by police as a man who was filming Gray's arrest from the middle of the street.

More details about the incident itself were also revealed at the press conference, though. Davis said that Gray was initially chased by three officers – two of them on bicycles and one on foot. Once apprehended, Davis said medical care should have been administered. Gray was placed in a police wagon, which stopped several times. At one point, Gray was removed and placed in leg braces.

READ MORE: Baltimore mayor calls for 'peaceful and respectful' protests

The wagon also stopped another time for officers to deal with Gray, and this moment is still under investigation.

The truck stopped a third time for an unrelated event, Davis said, and a second prisoner was placed inside. When it arrived at the Western District police station, an ambulance was called for Gray.

Police said they have conducted dozens of interviews, with more to come. While they have narrowed the timeline of events surrounding Gray’s arrest and detainment, questions remain unresolved, police said.

Batts deflected critics who have called for his resignation. “That’s not going to happen,” he said, adding that he remains focused on reforming the department.

He also said that the week-long protests have been largely peaceful and respectful, dismissing accusations that demonstrators are “wanting a fight.”

“We know this isn’t true,” he said. “We will remain steadfast to ensure they have the right to express their Constitutional rights.”

“To any and all that seek to bring chaos to our city, the people of Baltimore will not tolerate you hurting the community", he added. “Real chance for reform should not be lost to those who would find joy in destruction.”

Prior to the press conference, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan issued a statement calling Gray's death "a tragic loss."

"While Mr. Gray’s family and our community mourns, I also fully understand, and appreciate, the peaceful expressions of frustration displayed in the city. To date, the nature of these demonstrations have been a testament to Baltimore’s strong character and our common commitment to peace and justice."