​Donald Trump calls Obama ‘psycho’ over Ebola response

​Donald Trump calls Obama ‘psycho’ over Ebola response
Donald Trump is not a fan of US President Barack Obama, and the polarizing businessman is now venting his frustrations with Washington’s handling of the Ebola crisis. Trump went as far as calling the president a “psycho.”

Following the diagnosis of two Dallas health care workers – one of whomflew betweenOhio and Texas before reporting symptoms of the virus this week – Trump on Thursday lashed out at the government on Twitter.

Specifically, the businessman chastised Obama for not implementing a travel ban on the West African countries affected by the disease – and even questioned his sanity.

“I am starting to think that there is something seriously wrong with President Obama's mental health,” Trump wrote. “Why won't he stop the flights. Psycho!”

Trump then appeared on “The Steve Malzberg Show” over at NewsmaxTV, where he defended his tweet and elaborated on his thoughts.

"If you take a look at the whole thing about stopping the flights, I don't understand that," he said. "How could you not, not stop the flights?"

"There's something wrong and nobody knows what it is but there's something wrong," he added. "There's so many bad decisions. Can anybody be that incompetent? There's something wrong, there's something going on."

The billionaire went on to criticize Obama’s entire presidency, essentially arguing there wasn’t a single thing done correctly.

"Every decision this country has made is wrong,” he said. “Everything's wrong. Everything is going wrong for the United States. When was the last time you heard something good about the United States? You don't hear it. China just took over as the great economic power...this was unthinkable.”

The same day Trump blasted the president, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Tom Frieden cautioned lawmakers that implementing a travel ban could very well hurt efforts to contain and eliminate Ebola, especially in West Africa, where monitoring incoming and outgoing travelers is key.

Obama himself echoed Frieden’s concerns:

"If we institute a travel ban instead of the protocols that we've put in place now, history shows that there is a likelihood of increased avoidance," the president said Thursday, according to USA Today. "They're less likely to get treated properly, screened properly, quarantined properly. And as a consequence, we could end up having more cases rather than less."

When Trump heard the news, though, he was unsurprisingly upset.

“Looks like Obama will not stop the very potentially dangerous flights to and from West Africa,” Trump tweeted. “What the hell is wrong with this guy?”