Murdoch’s new favorite? Embarrassing snap shows Boris Johnson jogging with Sun editor

Murdoch’s new favorite? Embarrassing snap shows Boris Johnson jogging with Sun editor
What do you see in these pictures? Yes, that’s Boris Johnson wearing some appalling shorts. But look at the other runner. That’s the editor of Rupert Murdoch’s Sun newspaper with the Conservative foreign secretary.

Now, there is no law against influential editors and politicians getting together for some morning exercise. But with Murdoch widely seen as the kingmaker of UK politics, the run is likely to cause further cabinet chaos.

Johnson is currently being accused of attempting to overthrow Prime Minister Theresa May, and in recent weeks has used the press to help him.

Johnson published a 4,000-word essay on his vision for Brexit in the Telegraph – often jokingly referred to as the Torygraph – just over a week ago.

His Monday morning jog may be a coincidence, but with a takeover bid allegedly looming, it does not seem likely.

The pair, in almost-matching outfits – aside from Johnson’s bizarre shorts – was pictured when Johnson’s bodyguard took a tumble.

As the Tory Party conference gets underway in Manchester, questions are bound to be asked about what Johnson was up to as his peers got together to align themselves with May and her vision.

Johnson has been critical of the leader in recent weeks, reportedly prodding at her relationship with her chiefs of staff before the June vote, in which she almost crashed out of power.

According to reports he has given her less than a year before she fails and is thrown out of Downing Street.

Tory ministers have been left livid with his incessant interference on Brexit.

Former Education Secretary Nicky Morgan said he “has to go” unless he can show his loyalty to the government.

Others, including senior ministers and members of the influential 1922 Committee of backbench MPs, said they would fully support his removal from his portfolio.

Meanwhile, May has been attempting to appeal to young voters with policy changes which include pumping funds towards schemes like the Help To Buy program.