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Worlds Apart

RT

Worlds Apart is a fast-paced, in-depth discussion on the most pressing issues facing the world today.It strives to depart from the traditional Q&A form of interview in favor of a more emotive and engaging conversation. Host Oksana Boyko is not afraid to ask the hard questions that others avoid, with the aim of promoting intelligent public debate.

May 31, 2020 11:21

Herd impunity? Fyodor Lukyanov, editor-in-chief of Russia in Global Affairs

In just one Covid-19 stroke, biopolitics has replaced geopolitics, or rather it has turned into its inescapable strand. Quarantines have become the order of the day, while care for citizens’ health has removed the need for politicians to carefully calibrate or even explain their policies. Is what the doctor ordered now a new, unquestionable dogma? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Fyodor Lukyanov, editor-in-chief of Russia in Global Affairs.

May 24, 2020 09:42

Numbers envy? Robert Heimer, Professor of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, Yale School of Public Health

In a time of pandemic when good news is scarce, the idea that somebody is doing better than you could be a cause for, if not for celebration, then at least for a self-interested inquiry. But not when it comes to Moscow and Washington. When Russia and other countries post much, much lower Covid-19 mortality rates than the United States, are there other plausible explanations? Except, naturally, the cooking of numbers? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Robert Heimer, Professor of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases at the Yale School of Public Health.

May 17, 2020 08:26

Thought contagion? Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, Cardiff School of Journalism, Media & Culture

In one of the most resonant political speeches of the 20th century, Franklin Roosevelt told an anxious United States and a stricken world that “the only thing we have to fear, is fear itself.” Jump to the present day and that fear – nameless, unreasoning, paralyzing – is still in the air and many blame the media for it. Is the charge justified? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Karin Wahl-Jorgensen, director of research development and environment, Cardiff School of Journalism, Media & Culture.

May 10, 2020 09:15

Struck, stressed & binging? Paul Laursen, former lead of physiology for New Zealand Olympic athletes

As millions of people around the world seek relief from Covid-19 stress in comfort foods, could that be making the pandemic even worse? The ravaging effects of sugar on our bodies have been well documented but new findings about the virus’ biology indicate that it may have found a way to weaponize our sweet tooth. How can we deal with Covid-19 without becoming its accomplice? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Paul Laursen, former lead of physiology for New Zealand Olympic athletes and Paul Maffetone, clinician and coach.

May 3, 2020 06:57

Method in madness? Nassir Ghaemi, professor of psychiatry at Tufts University & bestselling author

Most of us agree that desperate times call for desperate measures, but do they also call for desperate leaders? Oksana’s guest believes that while sane leaders are well-suited for good times, a disturbed mind may be the best to see a country through rough times. How so? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Nassir Ghaemi, professor of psychiatry at Tufts University and Harvard Medical School and author of ‘A First-Rate Madness: Uncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Illness.’

Apr 26, 2020 07:04

Safe and sorry? Ekaterina Schulmann, political scientist

In less than two months, our notion of work-life balance has been turned on its head, with many of us longing for the things we used to loathe about our jobs and resenting the things we used to revere about our private lives. The historically unprecedented response to the Covid-19 pandemic has certainly messed up our life settings. What will the default be like once it’s over? To discuss this, Oksana is joined by Ekaterina Schulmann, political scientist and popular YouTuber.