Our daily demo: Thousands in Lebanon protest anti-Muslim film (PHOTOS)

Thousands of Lebanese protesters have gathered in the Southern city of Tyre to demonstrate against the US-produced film Innocence of Muslims, which has incited unrest around the world. More protests are expected throughout the week.

The protest comes at the behest of Hezbollah leader Sheikh Hassan Nasrallah, who has called for a series of protests throughout the week to denounce what he characterized as the "worst attack ever on Islam."

The demonstration follows a massive 100,000-strong protest in the capital Beirut on Monday, in which Nasrallah personally addressed the gathering in a rare public appearance.

Sunni Muslim cleric Ahmed al-Assir has called for a second demonstration to be staged in downtown Beirut on Friday to show his opposition to the film.

Demonstrations in the Islamic world routinely follow Friday prayers.

Lebanese security forces were also forced to bolster their presence around the French embassy in the capital on Wednesday following the publication of nude depictions of the Prophet Mohammed in the latest edition of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo.

Lebanese tanks and soldiers had formed a security cordon around the official residence of the French ambassador in Beirut. The Lebanese Army has also been deployed around the French cultural center in Sido.

Lebanese army soldiers secure the area around the Pine Residence, the official residence of the French ambassador to Lebanon, in Beirut September 19, 2012 (Reuters / /Mohamed Azakir)
Lebanese army soldiers secure the area around the Pine Residence, the official residence of the French ambassador to Lebanon, in Beirut September 19, 2012 (Reuters / /Mohamed Azakir)

France's embassy in Lebanon sent a text message to its citizens residing in the country to be cautious of their “movements” and to stay clear of large gatherings and potential protest sites, especially on Friday.

The French Embassy, consulate, cultural center and 20 schools around the country will also close on Friday out of fears that protests against the Mohammed caricatures could turn violent.

A leading Lebanese Salafist cleric Sheikh Nabil Rahim ominously warned the cartoons could spark more violence.

"We will try to keep things managed and peaceful, but these things easily get out of hand. I fear there could more targeting of foreigners, and this is why I wish they would not persist with these provocations," the Lebanese Daily Star cites him as saying.

Security around the US Embassy in Lebanon has also been beefed up since the anti-Islam film was released last week.

A trailer for Innocence of Muslims – a low-budget film portraying the Muslim Prophet Mohammed in a derogatory light – incited a violent backlash in Egypt and Libya on the anniversary of the September 11 attacks on the United States.

In Libya, Islamic militants used protests over the film as a screen to launch a brazen attack on the US consulate in Benghazi which resulted in the death of the ambassador and three other American citizens.

Protests quickly spread to engulf over 20 countries worldwide, with dozens dying in the ensuing violence.

Women supporters of Lebanon′s Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah shout slogans as they carry banners and Hezbollah flags at a protest against a film made in the United States that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
Women supporters of Lebanon's Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah shout slogans as they carry banners and Hezbollah flags at a protest against a film made in the United States that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
Supporters of Lebanon′s Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah wave Hezbollah, Lebanese and Amal movement flags as one of them carries a poster depicting Syria′s President Bashar al-Assad, at a protest against a film made in the United States that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
Supporters of Lebanon's Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah wave Hezbollah, Lebanese and Amal movement flags as one of them carries a poster depicting Syria's President Bashar al-Assad, at a protest against a film made in the United States that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
Protesters gesture as they carry Hezbollah and Amal movement flags and a picture of Lebanon′s Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah at a protest against a film made in the United States that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
Protesters gesture as they carry Hezbollah and Amal movement flags and a picture of Lebanon's Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah at a protest against a film made in the United States that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
A young supporter of Lebanon′s Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah carries a Hezbollah flag during a protest against a film made in the U.S. that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon, September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)
A young supporter of Lebanon's Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah carries a Hezbollah flag during a protest against a film made in the U.S. that mocks the Prophet Mohammad, in Tyre, southern Lebanon, September 19, 2012 (Reuters / Ali Hashisho)