#JeSuisCharlie rallies held worldwide to condemn Paris massacre (PHOTOS)

Members of Sydney's French community gather in the heart of the city to hold aloft banners reading "Je Suis Charlie" (I am Charlie) on January 8, 2015, in tribute to the victims killed after gunmen opened fire in the offices of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo  in Paris the day before. (AFP Photo/Peter Parks)
Thousands of people have taken to the streets of cities across the world overnight to show their sympathy for the victims of the Charlie Hebdo attack in Paris that killed 12 on Wednesday and wounded 11 more.

READ MORE: Fatal shooting at Charlie Hebdo HQ in Paris LIVE UPDATES

France saw the biggest rallies as residents from many cities, including Bordeaux, Strasbourg, Lyon, Metz, Nantes and Toulouse flooded the streets standing in solidarity with victims of the Charlie Hebdo shooting. In Paris, people lit candles and held up their pens to support press freedom.

READ MORE: Vigils held across Europe in support of Charlie Hebdo, press freedom (PHOTOS)

People hold signs reading "Nous sommes tous Charlie" (We are all Charlie) place de la Bourse in Paris as they observe a minute of silence on January 8, 2015. (AFP Photo/Loic Venance)

More than 1,000 people gathered at Pariser Platz outside the French Embassy in Berlin to show their sympathy for the Paris shooting victims and their families.

Many participants of the rally carried slogans “Je suis Charlie” [I am Charlie], while others chanted “Long live freedom of the press” and “long live caricature.” Demonstrators were holding candles.

People stand near Berlin's landmark the Brandenburg Gate during a spontaneous vigil outside the French embassy on January 7, 2015 in Berlin to express solidarity with employees of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo that has been target of an attack by unknown gunmen. (AFP Photo/Bernd Von Jutrczenka)

“I know a cartoonist who's worked at Charlie Hebdo and I've worked for satirical newspapers,” Joël Espi, a Swiss freelance journalist who organized the rally on Facebook, told the Local, adding that he was devastated by the attack.

Sweden also joined the global vigils to pay tribute to those killed and injured. About a hundred French expats and Swedish citizens gathered outside the French embassy in Stockholm.

“People are spontaneously gathering to show their emotion after this barbaric terrorist attack,” France’s Ambassador to Sweden Jacques Lapouge told The Local, “France is united in the defense of freedom of expression and of the press.”

READ MORE: France manhunt: Police raid homes, suspect surrenders after 3 gunmen kill 12 at Charlie Hebdo HQ

Hundreds demonstrators also joined rallies in Switzerland. At least 500 people assembled at the Place de la Riponne, in Lausanne, chanting “Je suis Charlie” and carrying candles.

READ MORE: One police officer killed in Charlie Hebdo attack was Muslim

“I grew up with Charlie Hebdo and the Canard Enchaîné (another French satirical weekly),” cantonal cabinet minister Béatrice Métraux told the 24heures newspaper, “I am profoundly shocked by what has happened.”

Also 500 people gathered in Geneva at the Uni Mall, one of the University of Geneva’s main buildings, while 200 people took to the streets of Bern.

London’s Trafalgar Square also hosted a vigil for the victims of Wednesday’s Paris shootings. Promoted by a spontaneous social media campaign, the London vigil is taking place alongside similar gatherings across the world.

A woman holds a placard that reads, "I am Charlie", during a vigil to pay tribute to the victims of a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, at Trafalgar Square in London January 7, 2015. (Reuters/Stefan Wermuth)

READ MORE: #JeSuisCharlie: Charlie Hebdo vigil in London’s Trafalgar Square after Paris shootings

Solidarity vigils were also held across the US. Manhattan's Union Square saw several hundred people who were chanting: "We are not afraid" and carrying signs "We are Charlie."

People participate in a vigil to pay tribute to the victims of a shooting, by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in the Manhattan borough of New York January 7, 2015. (Reuters/Carlo Allegri)

“These guys just proved today that laughter has become a very dangerous job,” French citizen Rick Therie told CBS Local.

Several hundred people assembled in front of France’s consulate in San Francisco on Wednesday night. The crowd, carrying flowers and candles, held pens in the air calling for freedom of the press.

People gather for a vigil outside the Consulate General of France to remember the victims of an attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in San Francisco, California January 7, 2015. (Reuters/Stephen Lam)

"There is nothing we can do but be together," Julia Olson, of Nimes, France, told ABC news.

Tara Manning, an American who works for a French-American Company, holds a sign as people gather for a vigil outside the Consulate General of France to pay tribute to the victims of an attack on satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in San Francisco, California January 7, 2015. (Reuters/Stephen Lam)

About 100 people in Seattle also joined the worldwide call. People, carrying signs in support of the victims, gathered near the French Consulate.

People hold a vigil for the victims of the shooting at the Paris offices of the publication Charlie Hebdo outside the French consulate in Seattle, Washington January 7, 2015. (Reuters/Jason Redmond)

In Australia, a vigil in Melbourne saw more than 1,000 people at the city’s Federation Square. It was organized by Maeva Siena, a member of the city's French community who knows a survivor of the attack.

"We will be thinking of all the family of the dead men,” she said.

"Even if we are far away from our country, we need to show them we are with them, and we are all concerned by what has happened in France."

Hundreds of Canadians came to show their support for the victims at Montreal’s French Consulate.

The city’s Mayor Denis Coderre invited Canadians to City Hall on Wednesday evening for a candlelight vigil.

"We have a duty to protect our freedom of expression. We have the right to say what we have to say,” he said.

French residents in Japan offer prayers in silence at the French ambassador's residence in Tokyo on January 8, 2015 for the victims attacked by gunmen at the office of French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo in Paris that killed 12 people on January 7. (AFP Photo/Yoshikazo Tsuno)

People try to light candles to form the word "Charlie" to pay tribute to the victims of a shooting by gunmen at the offices of weekly satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris, in front of the European Parliament in Brussels January 7, 2015. (Reuters/Francois Lenoir)

Along with the #JeSuisCharlie campaign, there is another campaign dedicated to Ahmed Merabet, the policeman who was killed in the massacre. His supporters have shared their feelings on Twitter using the hashtag #JeSuisAhmed.