Charlie Hebdo massacre aftermath Live updates

A combination of pictures taken on January 11, 2015 shows people taking part in the Unity rally "March Republicaine" in various cities in France in tribute to the 17 victims of a three-day killing spree by homegrown Islamists. (AFP Photo)
Anti-terror raids are being staged across the EU. Charlie Hebdo’s first post-attack edition, carrying a cartoon of the Prophet Mohammed on its cover, is triggering widespread protests from Muslims, and threats of violence from radical Islamists.
  • 23 January 2015

    20:59 GMT

    A Japanese publisher, Akira Kitagawa, plans to release a book featuring the controversial Charlie Hebdo cartoons ridiculing the Muslim Prophet Mohammed on February 10, Asahi Shimbun reported. The book titled “Islam Fushi Ka, Hate Ka” (Islam satire or hate), will contain about 43 satirical sketches from Europe and the United States, according to the publishing company’s president, Dai San Shokan.

    “Without seeing the cartoons themselves, we cannot debate why such portrayals are received with aversion. All we can do is take any criticism of the book in stride,” he said.

  • 20:59 GMT

    A Japanese publisher, Akira Kitagawa, plans to release a book featuring the controversial Charlie Hebdo cartoons ridiculing the Muslim Prophet Mohammed on February 10, Asahi Shimbun reported. The book titled “Islam Fushi Ka, Hate Ka” (Islam satire or hate), will contain about 43 satirical sketches from Europe and the United States, according to the publishing company’s president, Dai San Shokan.

    “Without seeing the cartoons themselves, we cannot debate why such portrayals are received with aversion. All we can do is take any criticism of the book in stride,” he said.

  • 13:26 GMT

    France has called on the UN to set up an international legal framework for monitoring social networks for extremist content and hate speech.

    “There are hate videos [online], calls for death, propaganda that has not been responded to, and we need to respond,” French State Secretary for European Affairs Harlem Desir told reporters during the first ever General Assembly meeting on combatting anti-Semitism on Thursday.

    Desir lambasted social networks, including Facebook and Twitter, for failing to take responsibility for “racist or anti-Semitic” content posted on their platforms.

    “[Those who propagate] terrorism, religious fanaticism, jihadism and radical Islam use the internet widely,” he said. "We must limit the dissemination of these messages.”

    As a way to crackdown on extremism, Desir suggested establishing a set of procedures that would “place the responsibility on those who are passing the message, even if they are not deciding the message.”

    French State Secretary for European Affairs Harlem Desir (Reuters / Charles Platiau)

  • 12:57 GMT

    France’s top legal body has moved to strip a French-Moroccan man convicted of extremism of his French nationality . The Constitutional Council declared on Friday that the fight against extremism justifies the ruling against Ahmed Sahnouni.

    Sahnouni, convicted in May 2013, is currently serving a sentence for “association with criminals in relation to a terrorist plot.”

    The council’s decision will set a precedent for future cases.

    Earlier this week, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said that removing a person’s nationality is a “legitimate” response if the person plans to “attack the nation to which they belong.”

    A view shows the entrance of the Constitutional Council (Conseil Constitutionnel) in Paris (Reuters / Charles Platiau)

  • 22 January 2015

    14:02 GMT

    France has announced new measures aimed at helping schools combat radical Islam, racism and anti-Semitism, Reuters reports.

    More attention will be devoted to France's secular tradition and teachers will be specifically trained for that purpose. December 9 will be marked as a "Day of Secularism."

    "Secularism must be applied everywhere, because that is how everyone will be able to live in peace with each other," Prime Minister Manuel Valls said earlier this week.

    The new measures have among other things been inspired by the refusal of students at dozens of French schools to join a January 8 nationwide minute of silence for the victims of the Charlie Hebdo attack.

  • 14:00 GMT

    A number of French families who happen to have the same surname as the Paris terrorists – Kouachi and Coulibaly – have been harassed, with some receiving death threats and insulting calls in the middle of the night.

    "I say it over and over again, my husband's name is Amedy Coulibaly, like the terrorist's, but we do not know him, we are not from the same family," a woman told Le Figaro. "We have nothing to do with him."

    Another housewife in Indre-et-Loire department in west-central France said her children were harassed at school.

    "Yes, we've got the same name as the Kouachi brothers, but that's all, we have nothing to do with them,” she complained. “Others began to insult them, they treated my son like a terrorist in high school, the same happened to my daughter in middle school. It's been tough for us ever since. At some point we even thought of changing our last name."

  • 10:29 GMT

    Police in North Rhine-Westphalia arrested two alleged members of the Islamic State extremist group, suspected of masterminding a terrorist act in Germany, the DPA news agency reports.

    The arrested men are German citizens – Mustafa C., 26, and Sebastian B., 27. They were reportedly trained at a militant camp in Syria.

    The prosecutor general, who ordered the arrests, said both men were “strongly suspected of undergoing combat training for the militant jihad.”

    No details on the attacks they were allegedly planning have been provided.

  • 09:44 GMT

    Around 100 people have rallied near the French embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, against the publishers of Charlie Hebdo, AP reports. The protesters accused the French satirical magazine of blasphemy. They were chanting “We love Muhammed” and carried banners with red hearts and the name of the Prophet.

    Protest organizer Abdul Saboor Fakheri says the demonstrators want the French Embassy closed and the ambassador expelled.

  • 09:22 GMT

    Amedy Coulibaly, the extremist, who killed a policewoman and four Jewish people in a kosher supermarket, will be buried in France, government spokesman Stéphane Le Foll told radio Europe 1.

    The man’s body was initially supposed to be transported to Mali in accordance with his relatives’ wish. But Malian authorities refused to accept Coulibaly’s remains, Thursday’s Le Parisien reports. No reasons for the refusal have been given.

  • 21 January 2015

    15:30 GMT

    France will in the next three years create 2,680 extra anti-terror staff, as over 3,000 radical Islamists require surveillance, Prime Minister Manuel Valls announced, revealing a new plan to boost terror strategies.

    The PM said the plan would cost €425 million.

    The number of radicals in the country is constantly growing. French intelligence needs to conduct surveillance on over 3,000 radical Islamists. In particular, 450 people who have previously participated in fighting in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen, and at the moment are taking part in sending volunteers to Syria and Iraq - they account for about 1,300 people,” Valls said as cited by TASS news agency.