Glenn Beck: Mel Gibson told me ‘Jewish people’ stole his ‘Passion of the Christ’

© Alessandro Bianchi
Mel Gibson has allegedly added to his collection of anti-Semitic remarks if you believe conservative host Glenn Beck, who claimed the Hollywood star told him that “Jewish people” stole his film “The Passion of the Christ.”

In a news story posted on Beck’s website, but later taken down, the 60-year-old Oscar-winning director and actor ranted that Jews attacked him and made his life hell before the film’s release.

Gibson was promoting his new World War II film “Hacksaw Ridge.”

The graphic 2004 film about the final days of Jesus and the crucifixion earned $612 million worldwide at the box office and was widely accused of featuring anti-Semitic stereotypes by Jewish scholars.

Katha Pollitt wrote in The Nation at the time that Passion “violated just about every precept of [United States Conference of Catholic Bishops]’s own 1988 ‘Criteria’ for the portrayal of Jews in dramatizations of the Passion (no bloodthirsty Jews, no rabble, no use of Scripture that reinforces negative stereotypes of Jews, etc.).”

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"Physically, they are anti-Semitic cartoons: The priests have big noses and gnarly faces, lumpish bodies, yellow teeth," added Pollitt who, for those keeping track, was born to a Protestant father and Jewish mother, but is also a signatory of the Humanist Manifesto.

“I expected Hollywood not to like it, but I lost my friends,” Gibson reportedly told Beck. “People wouldn’t even speak to me because of this movie… All of a sudden I’m a pariah.”

Referring to the comments, Beck continued: “And then some Jewish people - I guess rabbis or something, I didn’t get into it - somebody stole a copy of the movie before it was shown to anybody… And they did a deal in the New York Times with all these rabbis trashing him as an anti-Semite. And he said, ‘I couldn’t believe it… Nobody was really upset that these guys stole the movie…’”

“‘Glenn, they were stopping me on the streets and spitting on me—people from all walks of life stopping and they would spit on me on the streets.’” Gibson reportedly said. “‘I would be out some place nice, dressed up, and they would just tear me apart and [say] that I’m an anti-Semite.’”

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The story, along with a six-minute video clip of Beck’s narrative, were removed from the host’s website late on Friday, hours after they were posted, the Daily Beast reports.

Instead, an editor’s note said the post was removed because “it inadvertently revealed details of an off-the-record conversation.”

The Daily Beast was able to retrieve the original post by using Google Cache.

The allegations come ten years after Gibson’s infamous arrest for suspected drunk driving, when he told a police officer, “F*cking Jews. The Jews are responsible for all the wars in the world.”

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