Sound of your skull could soon be your new password

© Stefan Schneegass, Youssef Oualil, Andreas Bulling
Just when you thought fingerprint technology was enough to free you from the risk of forgetting your password, experts have taken the concept a step further.

Never ones to underestimate the power of human error, scientists have developed another way to combat weak memories by using the unique sound of a user’s skull. 

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A team of researchers from the University of Stuttgart, the University of Saarland, and the Max Planck Institute for Informatics in Germany, have developed enhanced security technology for the “increasing number of eyewear computers.” 

“SkullConduct” is a biometric system that taps into the bone conduction speaker and microphone technology already provided by devices like Google Glass. It analyzes the frequency response from a sound sent through the user’s skull. 

© David W Cerny

In other words, the technology sends a sound pattern into the user’s skull and then records the unique sounds that ping back. Then each time the user wants to access the device, SkullConduct repeats the process to identify them. 

The SkullConduct experiment, while small, was successful with 10 participants, with identification accuracy of 97 percent. The results proved to be “person specific and stable – even when taking off and putting on the device multiple times.” 

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While the fate of Google Glass remains unknown, the science behind SkullConduct could be the future.