Some turning to fantasy to escape US economy

Thousands of participants flooded into Comic Con 2010 in New York City. Was this interest fuelled by a desire to escape from the fears of the US economy?

For the last two years, the word “economy” in the United States has been synonymous to the notion of horror for millions of Americans throughout the country.

If I get fired, I am screwed,” said one New Yorker. He is not alone among millions of others like him, who will not be able to keep their homes or support their families if they become jobless.

Some have been choosing ways a little less legal to fight off their fears.

I sit in my room and I smoke a lot of weed,” said a young New Yorker.

But many have been choosing something completely different – more and more US citizens are trying to escape into the world of fantasy.

Crowds of people have been diving into places like Comic Con – a huge gathering of fans of comic books and sci-fi.

RT asked one individual in a robot costume if his look makes him feel more protected from economic troubles.


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He said, “I have my money in these little pockets so no one can touch it.

Several thousand people gathered on a week day.

Most of these people, I think they thought this was the unemployment office,” said one Comic Convention fan, geared up in nothing but a bathroom robe.

I am kind of bummed lately. Did not get dressed up. I just wear a robe. I lost my job. It’s the last thing I bought with my last pay check. Before I was dismissed,” he added.

Computer games, dancing and imaginary battles; what could be better ways to forget that an economic crisis is spreading across the country?

RT asked a man in a Yeti costume how come so many people were able to gather on a work day.

They get out early on Fridays,” the Yeti replied, even though it was only 2:00 PM.

With the possibility of a double-dip recession just around the corner, it “could” seem trickier to lure comic book shoppers in. But the world of fantasy is far from scared of losing its customer.

Prices on comic books range from three dollars, to a sum that could seem mind-blowing for many.

Detective Number 37 is the last before Robin came along. It’s $6,800.00,” said New York comic book salesman Dale Roberts.

But it could take both Spider-Man and Superman, with some added help from Hit Girl to pull the US economy out of the recession.