Top Obama lawyer admits 'Obamacare' is unconstitutional?

U.S. President Barack Obama. (Reuters / Larry Downing)
The top lawyer for the Obama administration stated that the President's groundbreaking health care plan may have been a little over ambitious.

­US Solicitor General, Donald Verrilli during the Supreme Court hearings on the health care reform also known as "Obamacare" has agreed that the president might have made an error mandating all Americans to purchase health insurance.

On Wednesday the two year old law which was an attempt by the Obama administration to overhaul of the US healthcare system was on the chopping block.

Verrilli was slammed by critics for his lousy appearance on Tuesday before the Supreme Court when he practically begged with the justices to keep “Obamacare.”

Maybe they were right, maybe they weren't, but this is something about which the people of the United States can deliberate and they can vote, and if they think it needs to be changed, they can change it,” Verrilli said referring to the congressmen's decision to pass the law.

According to Verrilli, the court should consider the elected leaders efforts to help millions of uninsured Americans.

Congress struggled with the issue of how to deal with this profound problem of 40 million people without health care for many years, and it made a judgment, and its judgment is one that is, I think, in conformity with lots of experts thought, was the best complex of options to handle this problem,” Verrilli said.

The hearing which lasted three days put nine Justices in the position to rule on whether the healthcare renovation would survive.

Many critics believe Obama’s groundbreaking plan is in severe jeopardy due to the fact that five of the justices involved in the hearings were opposed the plan from the beginning.

On the last day of the hearing the justices addressed two key issues.

The justices wanted to know whether the law could stand if the core requisite that most Americans must acquire insurance or face a fine is struck down, they also questioned the legitimacy of the growing state-federal Medicaid healthcare program.

The law, which is the latest attempt in 50 years to provide health insurance to the uninsured  and slow down soaring medical costs to an already $2.6 trillion US healthcare system, will be simmering in deliberation for three months and a ruling is expected in late June.

Many critics believe that Verrilli cries are an attempt at a political ploy for Obama’s 2012 Presidential campaign and a failed healthcare plan would only arm the Republican party with more mud to sling in political ads.

According to Reuters, 26 of the 50 states called the law in court. The lawyer who represented the case Paul Clement said, “I would respectfully suggest that it’s a very funny conception of liberty that forces somebody to purchase an insurance policy whether they want it or not.”

The mandate which gives Americans until 2014 to obtain healthcare insurance hangs on the balance of the justices who are reviewing the law.