Congress' debt discussion "Jive talk"

With the debt ceiling drama surrounding the American economy only getting worse and worse, the whole country is aware that the issue is becoming a national problem.

 While Congress is unable to agree on a compromise, however, the problem is beginning to hit hard on a slightly smaller scale. Last week the state of Minnesota was for the most part shut down and now 20,000 workers are looking to be laid off.

“It’s the beginning of what we are going to see more of,” says Trends Research Insitute Director Gerald Celente. “As governments continue to fail,”  he says, “you’re just going to keep seeing this spiral out of control.”

Celente says that the shut-down in the Land of 10,000 Lakes is an excellent example of how lawmakers are not only failing to appease each other, but their own citizens that elected them as well. When Minnesota closed their state parks for the Fourth of July weekend, Celente says they might as well have said “Lets make sure the people have nowhere to go.”

“It’s the same thing that the Obama administration and the Republicans are talking about. It’s cutting the people’s programs.”

Celente says that Social Security will be next. “People aren’t getting much now. We can even lower that!”

Is he joking? We’ll see.

As the rich get richer and the poor get poorer, Celente says we’re seeing the start of a great war that has been on the horizon for ages. “The people have been beaten down,” he says, and notes that the real resistance from the American public is coming. “Resistance comes when it really hits them hard and it hasn’t hit hard enough,” he says. Across the seas, the people of Greece have already showed their discontent.

Short-term or long-term, Celente says that the debt ceiling dilemma, whenever it gets solved, won’t actually change anything. “The reality is the debt can never be paid for,” he says, and adds that there is no end in sight.

And the talks about cuts to help save the budget? "Jive talk!"

As the people are put through harder times, Celente says lawmakers aren’t about to make any changes.

“Just take a look at the people in Congress,” he says.  “There isn’t a man among them.”