Atlanta cop offers up five years of terror

Atlanta cop offers up five years of terror
In Atlanta, Georgia, a rogue officer, Michael Hobbs, has gone around terrorizing citizens.

Records confirm that in numerous cases, Officer Hobbs is a firm believer of closed-fist beatings, knee strikes and choke-holds, and has been implementing them for at least the last five years.

"He was out of control," said Brian Hoolihan to a CBS affiliate in Atlanta.

Hoolihan fell prey to Officer Hobbs’ reign of terror when the cop came across him passed out in his vehicle.

Hoolihan had fallen into a diabetic coma back in 2007 and a police report shows Officer Hobbs turned up at the scene and instantly assumed that Hoolihan was in a drunken stupor.

At that point, Hobbs’ took matters into his own hands and powered his way into the vehicle. Once inside, Hobbs’ beat the diabetic twice with a clenched fist across his face followed by an elbow to the head.

"My face was all beat up, my ribs were either broke or cracked," said Hoolihan.

The strikes which started at Hoolihan’s face ended up with baton bruises on the back of his thighs and seven stitches above one eye.

"The next thing I remember is waking up in the ambulance," said Hoolihan to the media.

The beatings could have been avoided if Hobbs would have paid attention to the sticker on Hoolihan’s car warning about his diabetic medical condition.

In the past five years there have been more than 500 pages of internal affairs complaints filed against Clayton County Police Officer Michael Hobbs.

Hoolihan's was one of 12 victims who had filed complaints against Hobbs in the past five years at the Clayton County Police Department.

In a separate instance, security guard Vic Morton was responding to a call for help at an apartment complex he patrols, but found himself in police custody at the hands of Hobbs.

The charges filed against Morton were obstruction of justice, but according to Morton, Hobbs was just satisfying his hunger for power and looking for someone to arrest.

According to Morton, it “was just plain police brutality." He thinks Hobbs “needs to be put off the force."

The Metro Atlanta police officer has been compared to a thug and even a terrorist, but not everyone thinks Hobbs is a bad guy.

According to Clayton County Police Chief Greg Porter, Hobbs’ actions have been “within departmental policy and procedure."

Chief Porter confirmed that in the 58 incidents of use-of-force, no disciplinary actions have been taken against Hobbs, even in the span of those five years.

Apparently some officers on the force who don’t agree with the chief have felt it necessary to quit.

CBS Atlanta discovered a report from an ex-officer who resigned, citing Hobbs' out-of-control behavior and racist remarks as the reason for his departure from the force.

Many citizens in the area are concerned with the nonchalant attitude at the Clayton County Police Station and Morton Vic feels “the chief certainly can't clean up the county if he's not going to clean up his police force."