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Game of Thrones-loving tourists are destroying 2000yo Hadrian’s Wall (PHOTOS)

Game of Thrones-loving tourists are destroying 2000yo Hadrian’s Wall (PHOTOS)
Sections of the ancient Hadrian’s Wall in the UK have collapsed thanks to tourists standing on it to take selfies. The destructive day trippers are being drawn to the wall because it inspired the ice wall in Game of Thrones.

The 2000-year-old, 73-mile-long Roman structure is literally crumbling under the weight of careless tourists who are reportedly ignoring signs asking them not to climb over the wall.

An image posted to Twitter by local photographer Pete Savin shows a 10 foot section of the UNESCO World Heritage site which has been badly damaged.

The wall is the largest Roman archaeological feature in the world and was built in AD122. It is located in Northumberland and attracts thousands of visitors each year. The collapsed section of the wall is at Steel Rigg, close to a popular car park for tourist coaches.

The wall is the largest Roman archaeological feature in the world and was built in AD122. It is located in Northumberland and attracts thousands of visitors each year. The collapsed section of the wall is at Steel Rigg, close to a popular car park for tourist coaches.

“The damage I saw on Sunday was on a level I’d never seen before and I was truly shocked seeing the collapsed wall,” local photographer Pete Savin told the Mirror, adding: “It seems the selfie on Hadrian’s Wall is everything, regardless of the damage they unintentionally cause.”

A National Trust spokeswoman said work on the area would begin in July. “The project will help visitors understand how they can play their part in helping preserve Hadrian’s Wall by walking next to, and in the landscape that surrounds it, rather than on it, ensuring the monument can be enjoyed by future generations,” she said.

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