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Quantum leaping from Tula to the world? Continent-hopping monoliths are result of Russian teleportation test, says university

The prismatic ‘monoliths’ that have shown up in recent days throughout the world are actually the same experimental teleportation device currently being tested by Russian scientists - or at least so they claim.

Mysterious metal objects have been appearing and disappearing since last week in various parts of the planet, from a Utah desert to Romania’s countryside to a Californian mountaintop. 

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A university in Tula, Russia, claims that all the ‘monoliths’ – as they’ve been dubbed, after the mysterious object in Stanley Kubrick ‘Space Odyssey’ – were actually the same piece of experimental technology they are currently testing.

“Quantum leap experiments are unpredictable. An error made by a lab technician caused the object to incorrectly be transported to the US and later to Romania,” the scientists reported. 

Now ‘Object-542’ is back at our testing ground in the natural reserve of Konduki, they added, showing footage of the supposed device at the popular tourist destination as ‘proof.’

“Due to an influx of tourists and pilgrims, the work on the object will now be moved to our lab,” the jokey statement added, possibly pointing to the intended outcome of its release.

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