Duma deputy speaker predicts new, “most dangerous” resolution on Libya

Libya, Tripoli: A man holds a portrait of Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi on March 22, 2011. (AFP Photo / Mahmud Turkia)
The UN Security Council is likely to soon authorize ground operations in Libya, Russia's Liberal Democratic Party leader Vladimir Zhirinovsky has warned.

­Zhirinovsky, who is also deputy speaker of the parliament’s lower house, is planning to send his colleagues and “reliable journalists” to help Muammar Gaddafi’s regime in Libya.

The Duma deputy speaker pledged his support for Gaddafi, adding that deputies from his faction in the State Duma are ready to go to Libya. They could be accompanied by journalists who will “write the truth” about events in the country, he said.  

But the politician predicts a pessimistic scenario for the North African country. In his opinion, the UN Security Council will soon authorize ground operations in Libya. The third resolution will be “the most dangerous one,” he said.

If the UN Security Council considers such a move, the LDPR will ask Russian leadership to veto it, Zhirinovsky said.    

Libya's ambassador to Russia Amir al-Arabi Ali Gharib  met with the LDPR leader on Tuesday, and said Tripoli had the possibility “to thwart the aggression” of Western countries. In this case, about one million Libyan men will take up arms, he warned.

According to Ali Gharib, traces of Al-Qaida can be seen in the actions of insurgents in his country. He also said that Western countries are interested in oil and want to “transfer Russia to the sidelines.”

Libya may have other options not yet known to the general public to use against the aggression of "NATO countries", Zhirinovsky assumed.

The LDPR faction in the Duma demanded that the military explain why Russian weapons in Libya were destroyed “so easily during first minutes” of the coalition forces’ air strikes. Libya is one of the main purchasers of Russian weaponry.

Earlier Zhirinovsky asked the Nobel Committee to annul the Nobel Peace Prize it awarded to US President Barack Obama in 2009. “What kind of peace-keepers are they if they are shooting at an entire country with Tomahawks?” Interfax quoted him as saying. The politician described the actions of the US and other coalition countries as “a clear colonial practice” and interference in an independent state’s internal affairs.