Say what? Now US is accusing Syria of aiding ISIS

Robert Bridge
Robert Bridge is an American writer and journalist based in Moscow, Russia. His articles have been featured in many publications, including Russia in Global Affairs, The Moscow Times, Lew Rockwell and Global Research. Bridge is the author of the book on corporate power, “Midnight in the American Empire”, which was released in 2013. email:
Days after it was revealed that the West facilitated the rise of Islamic State in order to isolate the Syrian government, US officials now say Damascus is assisting the terror organization.

This week, the US blame game ratcheted up a huge notch, as the US Embassy in Syria took to Twitter, accusing Syrian government forces loyal to President Bashar Assad of “making airstrikes” in support of the jihadist group, and “aiding extremists against Syrian population.”

The message provided no proof other than a vague reference to “reports” to substantiate the bizarre accusation, which could be the next step in the Obama administration’s efforts to enter Damascus and depose Assad through the back door.

ISIS' magic carpet ride into Syria

Following the failure of the Obama administration to attack Syria in August 2013, it had to be satisfied with the next best thing: Promote the rise of Islamic State (formerly ISIS/ISIL), a group of thugs so unspeakably evil and heinous that even Al-Qaeda members had to turn away in disgust.

Yet for many observers, the timing of Islamic State’s emergence on Syria’s doorstep was simply too coincidental. Now all those tinfoil-hat conspiracy theorists appear to be exonerated for their views.

According to formerly classified documents acquired by Judicial Watch, a conservative watchdog group, it was revealed that as early as 2012, US intelligence not only predicted the rise of ISIS in the Middle East, but relished its arrival.

The heavily redacted document stated: “The West, Gulf countries, and Turkey support the opposition… If the situation unravels there is the possibility of establishing a declared or undeclared Salafist principality in Eastern Syria (Hasaka and Der Zor), and this is exactly what the supporting powers to the opposition want, in order to isolate the Syrian regime, which is considered the strategic depth of the Shia expansion.”

This document sheds a light on so many strange and inexplicable events – like entire truckloads of US military equipment falling into the hands of ISIS - that only makes sense when it is understood that the US has been carefully nurturing this Frankenstein’s monster from its inception.

Iraq Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi on Sunday revealed the list of weapons that fell into the hands of Islamic State after the fall of Mosul last year: 2,300 Humvee armored vehicles, at least 40 M1A1 main battle tanks, 74,000 machine guns, and as many as 52 M198 howitzer mobile gun systems, plus small arms and ammunition.

How can one explain Christmas gift-giving of this magnitude in the middle of Muslim country in the middle of June?

Unfortunately, the mystery does not end there. We also must consider the Pentagon’s blatant refusal for conducting any significant airstrikes on the jihadists as they advanced across wide open desert on the major Iraqi city of Ramadi. Where were the smart bombs, cruise missiles, fighter jets and drone strikes that we’ve seen employed in Afghanistan and Pakistan and other theaters? The US military could destroy Islamic State before lunchtime tomorrow if such a plan was desired. Obviously, it is not.

“The US did very little to prevent the fall of Ramadi,” writer and journalist Dan Glazebrook told RT.“It’s interesting that their key allies supposedly in the war against ISIS refused to cooperate with the real forces fighting against ISIS (the Syrian government, the Iranian government, the Shia militias, and so on). But even when their own key allies in Iraq against ISIS, the so-called Golden Division, US-trained Iraqi Special Forces, were calling for help and support and airstrikes they were not forthcoming, and that led to the fall of Ramadi.”

US Defense Secretary Ashley Carter reprimanded the Iraqi Army for not only abandoning Ramadi, but for leaving behind millions of dollars’ worth of equipment to Islamic State forces, and despite reportedly outnumbering the jihadists 10-to-1.

“What apparently happened was that the Iraqi forces just showed no will to fight,” Carter said. “They were not outnumbered. In fact, they vastly outnumbered the opposing force, and yet they failed to fight, they withdrew from the site.”

But in light of the sensational information regarding the hidden relationship between Islamic State and the US, it would seem more logical to say that the Iraqis were simply ordered to retreat from their positions, only to be later blamed by the Americans for their “lack of will.”

Indeed, considering that the type of warfare we are talking about – door-to-door urban fighting, where each side makes gains at an agonizingly slow pace – nothing else can explain the Iraqi Army’s immediate flight from combat.

READ MORE: ‘ISIS and Al Qaeda – working in tune with Western strategic designs’

“Iraqi forces evaporated all of a sudden, which makes no sense in urban street-by-street fighting,” observed Forbes contributor Melik Kaylan. “Normally, the confrontation reaches a critical mass and stays there for weeks before one side pulls out. In Mosul and Ramadi, ISIS had barely started attacking before Iraqis withdrew.”

Kaylan quotes a high-ranking Iraqi officer of Kurdish origin: “It was an extraordinary withdrawal and there was no reason for it. They pulled out so fast that in most cases they left their vehicles intact with their weapons and ammunition inside.”
But while the Americans have already had their military adventure in Iraq, together with the removal of Saddam Hussein, they are in the position to lecture the Iraqi troops.

However, the story is much more complicated in Syria, where the Obama administration is attempting to construct some sort of narrative to justify an attack on the Assad government, which is what the creation of ISIS comes down to.

Whipping up the Islamic State bogeyman like a sandstorm in the desert was the first step; accusing Syrian government forces of assisting this beast of burden was the second. Expect the third part of this epic tale and tragic farce to play out before the end of the year.


The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.