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Hysteria over Amy Coney Barrett reflects the complete lack of respect for Christian beliefs that is now so common

Micah Curtis
Micah Curtis

is a game and tech journalist from the US. Aside from writing for RT, he hosts the podcast Micah and The Hatman, and is an independent comic book writer. Follow Micah at @MindofMicahC

is a game and tech journalist from the US. Aside from writing for RT, he hosts the podcast Micah and The Hatman, and is an independent comic book writer. Follow Micah at @MindofMicahC

Hysteria over Amy Coney Barrett reflects the complete lack of respect for Christian beliefs that is now so common
Wild claims surrounding the new US Supreme Court judge are based on nothing other than the fact she is a Catholic. It demonstrates how many political progressives have no time for those who follow the word of the Bible.

There has been a substantial amount of mania surrounding the confirmation of Amy Coney Barrett to the US Supreme Court. Mania has become an odd sort of social currency these days, but there has been a ratcheting up of the rhetoric that has come with it. As an example, Vanity Fair ran an article that surmised that Barrett would allow for a future in which women who have abortions could be executed. The evidence behind this wild claim? Barrett’s refusal to answer a question during her confirmation hearing.

What few people seem prepared to acknowledge is that the mania appears to be based around Barrett being a Catholic. There’s no evidence that Barrett believes in any wild conspiracy theories, but that hasn’t stopped the crazy claims. And what’s telling is that this isn’t the only nutty overreaction to a religious person lately. 

Guardians of the Galaxy actor Chris Pratt was targeted for cancellation by the mob. The reasoning used to justify this was based around Pratt being a Christian, and those beliefs somehow equating with white supremacy. How the two were connected was never explained, but that was where the hysteria lay. It ended with the ‘Avengers’ cast coming to his defense, stating that Pratt was a man of great moral character.

Another Christian who weighed in on this in Hollywood was Matthew McConaughey. The Emmy-nominated actor discussed it during his appearance on The Joe Rogan Experience. He stated that he had seen ‘closeted’ Christians in Hollywood start to applaud when he would thank God at an awards show, then stop themselves. This is an odd way of looking at one’s faith. It’s meant to be something that people are proud of, and yet in Hollywood if you celebrate it, you face meeting the same fate as Chris Pratt.

It is these examples of mania that make one raise an eyebrow. Why exactly are these assumptions being made about Christians? And it’s not just high-profile individuals who are affected. In California, Los Angeles County sent the Health Department after a church whose pastor is suing Governor Gavin Newsom. Private religious schools in Oregon have been shut down while public schools are open, with the state being sued for it. Washington, DC is also being sued for similar reasons, with 34 senators filing an amicus brief in support of it. All of these cases are in politically progressive areas. 

I believe there’s enough evidence to say that progressivism clashes with Christianity on the most basic level. I’d even argue that people who are politically progressive and lawmakers with the same beliefs have an anti-Christian bias. Time and time again, Christians, like myself, end up targeted by progressives. As we have seen, they’re being targeted by the lawmakers’ restrictions, they’re being canceled on Twitter or smeared in publications. 

Also on rt.com Senate Judiciary Committee approves Amy Coney Barrett Supreme Court nomination despite Democrats' boycott

I believe that there is generally a conflict between the belief structures, almost as if they are oil and water. When it comes to progressivism, there is a belief in a class structure, a sort of hierarchy of oppressed groups and oppressors, a distaste toward capitalism and also toward Western ideas. But many of the ideas that the West was founded on came from Christianity or from people who were either Christians or grew up in a Christian household. 

There is also a fundamental difference in opinion in the role of government. Many Christians in America believe that rights come from God, and that government should protect those rights. Progressives believe that the government gives these rights, and can dictate what those are and are not. 

As such, these two world views cannot seem to exist in the same sphere, causing a conflict that gives way to massive abuses of power in the press and in government. Ultimately, this is why the Constitution is structured the way that it is here in America, and why progressives dislike both Christianity and constitutionalism. It protects the very thing they despise so much.

And this is why they try to make the lives of people who are Christian so difficult. They simply cannot abide our beliefs. 

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The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

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