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Hey US Army, nothing shows ‘full spectrum dominance’ like FLEEING Twitch pursued by the woke brigades!

Nebojsa Malic
Nebojsa Malic

is a Serbian-American journalist, blogger and translator, who wrote a regular column for Antiwar.com from 2000 to 2015, and is now senior writer at RT. Follow him on Twitter @NebojsaMalic

is a Serbian-American journalist, blogger and translator, who wrote a regular column for Antiwar.com from 2000 to 2015, and is now senior writer at RT. Follow him on Twitter @NebojsaMalic

Hey US Army, nothing shows ‘full spectrum dominance’ like FLEEING Twitch pursued by the woke brigades!
The world’s supposedly most powerful military just retreated from the streaming platform Twitch after a campaign by social justice activists. If only it could be so stunning and brave when it came to ending pointless foreign wars.

The US Army esports team has “paused streaming” on its Twitch channel to “review” policies and procedures, a spokesman confirmed on Wednesday in a dollop of Pentagon-speak. Rumors in the gaming world even said that all social activity was paused as well, and that activity may not resume until spring 2021 – if at all.

While the Army’s esports effort has always had an element of cringe – from the “how do you do fellow kids” approach to teen video-gamers to the saccharine babytalk about plushies on Twitter, beating a retreat over some bad press doesn’t exactly scream “Army Strong” or “What’s Your Warrior.” It’s less “Be All You Can Be” than flee where you can flee, if you catch my drift.

Also on rt.com Say uwu? US Army esports division causes cringe with online babytalk as people are baffled by its existence

We have the most incredible military,” President Donald Trump said just last week in the Rose Garden of the White House. “We have the best tanks, the best ships, the best missiles, rockets.  We have the best of everything.”

Yet this formidable armada was run off Twitch not by China, Russia, Iran or North Korea, but by the most dreaded enemy of all: American social justice activists and the media. The push appears to have been spearheaded by Jordan Uhl, a journalist and self-described progressive activist. 

Uhl was outraged that the Army was using Twitch to recruit “children in unstable and/or disadvantaged situations,” and spreading “hawkish agitprop day after day,” so he started bringing up the US “history of atrocities around the globe” – and got himself banned from the channel. Naturally, he went to the American Civil Liberties Union and the Columbia University's Knight First Amendment Institute, to complain about how this was a violation of his free speech rights. Uhl also documented his campaign for The Nation, a liberal magazine, where the above quotes came from.

Also on rt.com Twitch cracks down on US Army’s ‘fake giveaway’ program aimed at teens after activist complains

Within a day of the Nation publishing Uhl’s article, Twitch was demanding the Army take down links to an Xbox controller giveaway contest. Uhl had called it illegal, because the contest didn’t list all the information required by law and basically served to harvest addresses for recruitment purposes. The Army dutifully complied. 

Smelling fear, New York Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez joined the fray. The firebrand mascot of the Democrats proposed a draft amendment to the military funding bill on Wednesday, which would prohibit the Pentagon from maintaining a presence on “any video game, esports, or livestreaming platform.”

Mind you, these same Democrats just voted overwhelmingly against the withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan or Germany, where their presence became pointless long ago. Democrats – and some warmongering Republicans – also raised hell when Trump ordered the pullout from Syria, where they have no legal right to be in the first place. 

That was nothing compared to the fury that greeted Trump’s mere proposal to use the military to quell the riots rampaging across America’s cities in June, however. Former generals and admirals joined the media and Democrats in denouncing the “dictator,” compelling General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to offer a groveling public apology for standing next to Trump outside the White House. Milley apologized for supposedly politicizing the military – thereby politicizing the military in service of Trump’s critics.

Thus browbeaten into submission, the Pentagon was then subjected to an all-out attack on the Diversity, Inclusion and Equity (DIE) front, with demands to rename military bases named after Confederate generals a century ago, and ban the displays of the Confederate flag as a “hate symbol.” 

The flag ban, implemented last week, was then criticized for outlawing Black Lives Matter and LGBT flags in its wording – something Defense Secretary Mark Esper will no doubt address at the next meeting of the DOD Board on Diversity and Inclusion, as soon as it finishes reviewinghairstyle and grooming policies for racial bias.”

America’s $1 trillion-a-year military is deployed in hundreds of military bases and outposts around the globe, seeks to make space a warfighting domain, and aims to establish “full spectrum dominance” in order to intimidate Russia, China and others into submission. Yet it crumbles like wet tissue paper before media criticism and woke activism at home and can’t even defend itself on a video-game streaming platform.

Turns out these colors do run, after all.

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The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

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