Europe coughing up cash for US military gamble in Iran - analyst

Europeans should question why they are being asked to pay for an American-Israeli adventure in Iran during a time of unprecedented austerity, political analyst Chris Bambery told RT.

Iran says it will definitely put a swift stop to oil exports to "certain" European countries. A possible cut in supplies to other EU states is still under discussion.

The move comes in response to an EU oil embargo scheduled to come into force on July 1.

Political analyst Chris Bambery believes Tehran is referring to leading European powers like Britain and France when it refers to “certain” countries. He cites well-documented Western fears of Iranian-directed terrorist attacks in the US and Europe and Tehran's possession of missiles capable of reaching both.

“The Iranians must understand from recent history that the history of sanctions, like in the case of the former Yugoslavia or Iraq, has been to soften up those countries in preparation for a military assault,” Bambery told RT.

Iran is already surrounded by US military bases, so Tehran is surely feeling the pressure of the recent build-up in the Persian Gulf. The situation is dangerous because of the possibility of accidental clashes like the 1988 incident when a US missile accidentally shot down an Iranian civilian airliner over the Strait of Hormuz. The incident claimed the lives of all 290 passengers and crew aboard, uet Washington has never apologized.

Bambery called on the people of Europe and America to force their governments to pull back and start talking with Iran, instead of imposing sanctions on it.

Events in Libya and now Syria set a vivid example of what awaits the Iranians: “They must feel they are next on the list,” Bambery says.

Despite repeated statements that the US cannot roll out another war, Bambery says, Israel could still attack Iran, bringing immediate retaliation from Tehran and launching a fully-fledged military engagement.

In the meantime, the Iranian oil embargo will deal a low blow to Europe – particularly the crisis-stricken southern states like Greece and Italy – with the ensuing hike in oil prices hitting at other EU countries as well.

Europeans would be better off asking their governments why recession-stricken European national economies should support a war with their oil supplier, Bambery concluded.