Bailouts could have disintegration effect on Europe - German MP

Germans feel it is unfair they should bear the financial brunt of the bailout. German MP Klaus-Peter Willsch does not believe aid packages will help either those paying them or those receiving them.

Klaus-Peter Willsch believes that all European countries have to solve their debt crises by themselves.

“In the EU treaty it was regulated that there must not be any bailout, because otherwise you will ruin the public finances of those countries you are contributing to,” he said. "As long as each county is responsible for its budget it has to take full responsibility and the only right answer to that is no bailout.”

“Sticking to the rules is the thing we can do in order to keep European cooperation peacefully,” he added. “It is not the easy truth, but blankly the truth.”

He claims that the “beggar my neighbor policy” strongly affects German economy as well.

“In Germany we are making a lot of efforts to keep public debt under control,” he said. “We have just amended out constitution, we put there so-called Schuldenbremse debt brake, which defines the steps we have to take with our budgets in order to come to zero-line and then start paying the debt back. And it is dangerous if this is infected by national policy of other euro partners.”

“The Germans are no big revolutionaries,” he added. “But when you drive them too far, that won’t work any longer. We have figures at the election that go down. Part of it is explained by this policy which is not simple to explain because it is not the right policy.”

According to Klaus-Peter Willsch, Greece and Portugal should leave the euro to save the European Union.

He believes bailouts can have a disintegration effect on Europe, so he is aiming for limiting the bailouts of Greece and Portugal.

“Europe as a whole may be infected with parties on both sides demonstrating against the IMF, ECB, and euro-commission obligations,” he said.

Although, he strongly disagrees that will cause the euro or European Union to fail.

Willsch is in favor of more countries joining the EU in political perspective. But he believes they should keep it slow in adopting the euro as their currency.

He also explained why he is against Turkey joining the EU.

“The third biggest Turkish city in fact is Berlin, so we don’t have problems in collaborating with them,” he said. “But I think the political project of Europe should be concentrated on Europe.”

“We are collaborating with a lot of other regions in the world,” he added. “That has nothing to do with chauvinism, or nationalism, or ‘Europism’. It is just our choice, I think. We want Europe in that shape.”