Libya’s former UN ambassador fears for life in jail

Libya's ambassador to the United Nations, Abuzed Omar Dorda, gestures as he speaks 29 September to the 53rd session of the General Assembly at United Nations headquarters in New York (AFP Photo / Matt Campbell)
A former Libyan PM and Ambassador to the UN now in NTC custody in Tripoli has suffered broken legs and other injuries following what relatives claim was a murder attempt by guards.

The news comes just days after some 300 bodies of alleged Gaddafi allies were found in Sirte, raising concerns that the NTC has sanctioned political executions in the fashion of the Gaddafi regime they rebelled against.

Dorda’s son-in-law, Adel Khalifa, wrote to the UN Security Council's Nigerian president, U. Joy Ogwu, according to Foreign Policy magazine, which has a copy of the email.

“Most of you may have known and dealt with Mr. Dorda during his tenure as Prime Minister of Libya, we kindly request your help in dealing with this issue so that we can spare his life and guarantee his safety. This is a humanitarian issue.”

RT spoke with Dorda’s family on condition of anonymity. They confirmed that he was thrown from the second floor of the prison by guards and severely beaten. Abdullah Dorda, the former PM’s brother also confirmed the allegation.

Former Libyan Prime Minister Abuzed Dorda’s legs were broken amid a murder attempt by NTC prison guards. That’s according to his family, who have issued a humanitarian plea he be protected while in NTC custody.

However the Libyan media maintains that Dorda jumped from the window in a bid to escape or commit suicide.

Human Rights Watch also say they visited Dorda and reported he was fine, but that was two weeks prior to the murder/escape/suicide attempt. In response Dorda’s family claims HRW is not doing its job.

Dorda’s family has been told that he is in Tripoli’s Mitiga Hospital. However, they have no means of contacting him, and cannot verify the conditions in which he is being held as security concerns prevent them from going to the hospital.

At the moment the family is “moving to a safer location” where they should arrive in the next two days.

The appeal to the UN claims “Dorda is not receiving the proper treatment duly and legally accorded a political prisoner, let alone that required under the terms of human rights and other international treaties.”

Amongst his international colleagues Dorda has a reputation as one of the least corruptible people in Libyan politics. He was arrested on September 11, while holding the post of head of external intelligence for the Gaddafi regime. The arrest followed a freeze of Dorda's financial assets imposed by the US and UN Security Council as they took action against Muammar Gaddafi's inner circle.

His family believes Dorda is seen as a threat because many Libyan people still want him to be part of the future political process of the country. They also warn that if he is assassinated or continues to be treated inhumanely, it could create a public backlash.