icon bookmark-bicon bookmarkicon cameraicon checkicon chevron downicon chevron lefticon chevron righticon chevron upicon closeicon v-compressicon downloadicon editicon v-expandicon fbicon fileicon filtericon flag ruicon full chevron downicon full chevron lefticon full chevron righticon full chevron upicon gpicon insicon mailicon moveicon-musicicon mutedicon nomutedicon okicon v-pauseicon v-playicon searchicon shareicon sign inicon sign upicon stepbackicon stepforicon swipe downicon tagicon tagsicon tgicon trashicon twicon vkicon yticon wticon fm

Great Pyramid-sized ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid traveling towards Earth

Great Pyramid-sized ‘potentially hazardous’ asteroid traveling towards Earth
A “potentially hazardous” asteroid that’s slightly larger than the Great Pyramid of Giza is set to hurtle past Earth this month at a whopping speed of 18 kilometers per second.

The enormous asteroid, dubbed 2019 OU1, measures to 160 meters (524 feet) in diameter, the equivalent to the Washington Monument, or 20 meters bigger than Egypt’s most famous pyramid. 

The Apollo-class celestial rock is set to whiz past Earth on August 28 at a phenomenal 18km per second. According to NASA’s Center for Near-Earth Object Studies (CNEOS) the asteroid will come 40 times closer to Earth than Venus, our nearest neighbor, when it passes at a distance of about one million kilometers.

Also on rt.com Four asteroids on COLLISION course with Earth

NASA rates any cosmic projectile with an approach distance of less than approximately 7.5 million kilometers (0.05 astronomical units) and measuring over 460 feet in diameter as “potentially hazardous.” 

August has already been quite the month for asteroids. Another whopper space rock, which was larger than the Empire State Building, flew past Earth at about 10,400 mph in the early hours of Saturday morning.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

Dear readers and commenters,

We have implemented a new engine for our comment section. We hope the transition goes smoothly for all of you. Unfortunately, the comments made before the change have been lost due to a technical problem. We are working on restoring them, and hoping to see you fill up the comment section with new ones. You should still be able to log in to comment using your social-media profiles, but if you signed up under an RT profile before, you are invited to create a new profile with the new commenting system.

Sorry for the inconvenience, and looking forward to your future comments,

RT Team.

Podcasts