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Rand Paul poised to bring change to US Senate

Dr. Rand Paul has found himself as the surprising frontrunner in the Republican primary for a Kentucky US Senate seat.

Polls show that Paul has a double-digit lead over opponent Trey Grayson, the Republican Party establishment's choice in the GOP race. The highest-ranking Republican in the US Senate, Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky) has strongly backed Grayson, and his loss would be a setback for traditional Republicans trying to overcome the challenge of the Tea Party movement.

Paul, an eye surgeon who has never held elected office, is the son of Representative Ron Paul (Republican-Texas) who many consider a driving force in the Tea Party. Although the mainstream Republican establishment is backing Paul’s opponent, some big names have come out in support of Paul, including former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin.

It’s a perfect storm", said Paul. "People are ready for an outsider; they are ready for a non-politician. They’re ready for something different than what we have been getting.

We’re trying to fix the country not trying to win elections” said Ronnie Paul, the eldest son of Ron Paul and Rand Paul's brother.

In addition, RT correspondent Dina Gusovsky noted that a Rand Paul victory would be a clear mandate for the Tea Party and Tea Party supporters, and a disappointment for the Republican establishment. The Kentucky race, along with primaries on May 18 in Arkansas and Pennsylvania, are looked at as bellwethers for the upcoming November midterm elections.

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