Bilderberg 2010 wrapping up in Spain

The annual meeting in which the world's most powerful people come together and discuss world affairs in secret is wrapping up in Sitges, Spain.

The Bilderberg Group is an unofficial conference of around 150 invitation-only guests who are insiders in politics, banking, business, the military and the media. The group’s meetings are held in secret and are closed to the public; the group supposedly meets to strategize global politics and economics for the coming year. The recent 2010 conference was held at a luxury hotel in Sitges, Spain under heavy security.

Reports indicated that the 2010 meeting focused on the development and strengthening of the Euro.

The conference has drawn in a dedicated group of protestors and journalists attempting to cover the event, but police and security guards have harassed and detained some of them.

Journalist Charlie Skelton from The Guardian who is in Sitges said that brushes with law have been minimal this time around, compared to previous years where protesters and journalists were met with violence and arrests.

Unlike past years Skelton was able to secretly take photographs of a few of the attendees at the conference. The deletes do their best to remain unseen. Skelton was able to snap a picture of Henry Kissinger in attendance at the conference, still heavily involved in world affairs.

We still are trying to work out who goes to this thing, let alone what they talk about,” said Skelton.

The Bilderberg Group has been in existence since the 1950’s and has been cited as being instrumental in the formation of the European Union and driving modern globalization

The event remains highly secretive, something Skelton is baffled by, since the organization is supposedly working towards a better world.

I don’t really understand the secrecy. But, what I do understand is that elected officials are going to this thing. For example, David Cameron, our new prime minister went in 2008, just two years before he became prime minister. That seems to be a bit of a pattern, people attending Bilderberg and then getting a bit of a career boost,” said Skelton.

Skelton also learned from a limousine driver that the estimated cost for security at the conference was about 10 million Euros.