American conspiracy theorists come together

People who do not accept the official explanation for many events have gathered in California for the annual Conspiracy Convention. Some visitors even have their own take on the events of 9/11.

Every year, the theorists come together to share everything from alien encounters to fortune telling. You can even take a test to see what a colorful aura can say about you.

Even though testing the color of your aura isn’t exactly in line with conspiracy theories, what this conference does is provide a forum for those speakers, often ignored on their own, to have a voice together, especially those involved with the Truth movement.

As the name suggests, these people believe they are spreading the truth, but their ideas are shunned by the government and mainstream media. Take Dave Vonkleist, a musician and radio host. He has produced two documentaries in an attempt to get to the bottom of what really happened on 9/11. Just don’t call him that dirty word:

“If I try to speculate, I become a conspiracy theorist. I am not theorizing anything. If you notice, I have no theory,” Dave says.

The 700 members of architects for the 9/11 Truth movement look at the events from a technical outlook, suggesting it took more than terrorists for the buildings to fall down. With 20 years as a renowned architect, Richard Gage believes he knows what he’s talking about:

“We’re delighted to go anywhere to present the evidence of explosive controlled demolition, of all three high rise buildings on 9/11.”

The events of 9/11 are not the only hot topic at the convention. Russell Means represents the Republic of Lakotah – the sovereign Native American nation tired of being on the political fringe.

“We unilaterally withdrew our treaties with the US government, which makes us lawfully, free and independent. But thanks to the racism of the US, they’re ignoring us, we’re just primitive savages,” Russell Means said.

Conspiracy or truth, it’s up to you to decide, but some arguments are unnervingly convincing.