Florida battens down hatches as Hurricane Matthew nears, with some notable exceptions (PHOTOS)

© Phelan Ebenehack
Like the big bad wolf, Hurricane Matthew is threatening to blow down all the houses on Florida’s Atlantic Coast. While many residents evacuated before the storm hit, not everyone had that option – especially if they have feathers.

READ MORE: Hurricane Matthew reaches US coast

Preparing for a hurricane typically involves boarding up windows, stocking up on water and, in the worst cases, evacuating. But the animals at the St. Augustine Alligator Farm and Zoological Park did not have that option, so they made do with what they had. Most animals were secured in indoor cages and offices, while baby alligators were held safe in large water-filled buckets, the New York Daily News reported.

But one stork managed to get the luxury suite in the St Augustine Zoo. The Marabou stork stayed safe and sound in the bathroom that is typically reserved for human guests, but St. Augustine Alligator Farm Zoological Park posted on Facebook that there is “No species discrimination in this bathroom!

Hurricane Matthew was downgraded from a level 5 hurricane to a level 2 on Friday, which is good news for many people – particularly one mysterious driver who was photographed traveling in the opposite direct of evacuees. What lured the person away from higher ground and safety remains a mystery that is open to speculation.

While many took necessary precautions to minimize damage, Matt Drudge took to Twitter to discourage people from taking it seriously, saying: “The deplorables are starting to wonder if govt has been lying to them about Hurricane Matthew intensity to make exaggerated point on climate” and “Hurricane Center has monopoly on data. No way of verifying claims. Nassau ground observations DID NOT match statements! 165mph gusts? WHERE?

The easy answer to that question is Haiti, but regardless that did not stop likeminded individuals from calmly and rationally discussing it – just kidding! There was a lot of vitriolic anger directed at seemingly neutral targets who reported on the hurricane and advised evacuations.