‘Last chance’: Climate activists across US call for decisive actions at Paris summit

People take part in a protest about climate change around New York City Hall at lower Manhattan, New York, November 29, 2015. © Eduardo Munoz
On the eve of a global climate summit in Paris, activists across the US marched in support of new environmental initiatives, calling for meaningful discussions and decisive actions from world leaders at the “last chance” conference.

READ MORE: Global Climate March: Tens of thousands rally around the world against climate change

More than 5,000 people flocked to City Hall in New York to take part in an environmental gathering there.

“The climate is changing. It’s our fault, and we have to get to work on this now,” celebrity scientist Bill Nye told NY Daily News.

“The most important greenhouse gas has almost doubled in less than two centuries,” he said. “As long as we each focus only on our individual decisions and their short-term consequences, we will act like renters, not owners of this Earth.”

On a local level, activists in the Big Apple want the city to use 100 percent clean, renewable energy by 2030.

Environmental activists have also held a demonstration in front of the White House in Washington DC, urging US President Barack Obama, who is attending the conference in Paris, to adopt binding targets for emissions reduction.

Protesters also want industrial polluters to aid developing countries cope with preventing climate change. As part of the global environmentalist movement, the activists also call for a lower target cap for global temperature increase – from 2 degrees Celsius to 1.5 degrees.

Holding signs reading ‘keep it in the ground,' activists called for the increased usage of renewable energy sources and less reliance on traditional fossil fuels.

Over on the West Coast, a few hundred people gathered outside Los Angeles’ city hall.

“Unlike previous climate summits, Paris is the 'last chance' for a meaningful international treaty to reduce greenhouse gas pollution in time to avoid irreversible climate disruption,” organizers said in a statement.