icon bookmark-bicon bookmarkicon cameraicon checkicon chevron downicon chevron lefticon chevron righticon chevron upicon closeicon v-compressicon downloadicon editicon v-expandicon fbicon fileicon filtericon flag ruicon full chevron downicon full chevron lefticon full chevron righticon full chevron upicon gpicon insicon mailicon moveicon-musicicon mutedicon nomutedicon okicon v-pauseicon v-playicon searchicon shareicon sign inicon sign upicon stepbackicon stepforicon swipe downicon tagicon tagsicon tgicon trashicon twicon vkicon yticon wticon fm

Britain’s housing crisis: Homeless kids forced to live in shipping containers - report

Britain’s housing crisis: Homeless kids forced to live in shipping containers - report
Thousands of homeless British children are living in makeshift accommodation, including shipping containers and cramped former office blocks, putting their health at serious risk, according to a new report.

Research published on Wednesday by Anne Longfield, the children’s commissioner for England, reveals that 210,000 young people in homeless families are having to live in temporary housing.

Longfield believes that the housing system, which leaves thousands of families living in insecure places for long periods of time in one of the wealthiest countries in the world, is a “scandal.”

Something has gone very wrong with our housing system when children are growing up in B&Bs, shipping containers and old office blocks.


Longfield’s report titled ‘Bleak houses’ found that the main causes of family homelessness were two-fold. Firstly, the short supply of affordable housing and secondly financial instability, created by the UK government’s welfare changes that has seen severe cuts to benefits.

Also on rt.com One in 200 Britons homeless, new research shows 4% increase since 2017

Converted shipping containers are increasingly being used by councils to provide temporary housing for homeless families. Although they are seen as preferable to bed and breakfast accommodation, inhabitants complain that they are too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter.

Podcasts