Tens of thousands march in London in largest #StopTrident demo in decades

Protesters opposing the renewal of UK's costly nuclear deterrent, Trident, have taken to the streets of London. With a number of organizations participating, many young people are at the demo, saying there are better ways to spend taxpayers' billions.

People gathered Saturday noon at Marble Arch, and headed for Trafalgar Square, turning central London into a sea of banners. The movement's #StopTrident hashtag has been trending on Twitter.

"Tens of thousands" took to the streets, according to the Evening Standard.

People arrived to attend the London march not only from across the UK, but also from around the world, the Guardian reported, saying that there were protesters from as far away as Australia.

Many have been chanting "Cameron out, Corbyn in!" expressing their support for the Labour opposition leader, Jeremy Corbyn.

Addressing the protesters in Trafalgar Square, Corbyn thanked the thousands-strong crowd “for wanting a peaceful future for this country and the rest of the world.”

Everyone who is about to make a decision on what we do about our nuclear weapons, should think about the humanitarian effects on wholly innocent people anywhere across this globe if they are ever used,” the Labour leader said, adding that peace in the modern world cannot be achieved “by planning for war and grabbing each other’s resources, and not respecting each other’s human rights.”

Other politicians, as well as academics and celebrities have joined the anti-nuclear campaigners in the national march, which was organized by the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament (CND).

READ MORE: EXCLUSIVE: Trident whistleblower William McNeilly breaks silence ahead of London demo (VIDEO)

A plan to renew UK's nuclear-weapon submarine carrier Trident has been put forward, with MPs due to vote on funding later in the year. While the upgrade would only affect the defense program's submarines and not the nuclear missile, Trident is still estimated to cost the nation nearly £170 billion.

Meanwhile, activists have been calling for total nuclear disarmament, saying the billions of pounds should be spent on other causes, such as education, healthcare and climate protection rather than on weapons of mass destruction.