#UKIP100Days: Channel 4 slammed for docudrama political ‘bias’

Screenshot from YouTube user Channel 4
TV broadcaster Channel 4 has aired its “controversial” documentary 100 Days of UKIP, which imagines life in Britain under a Nigel Farage government.

The “ground-breaking” documentary, which received over 20 complaints before it even aired on Monday night, was branded “biased” and “partisan” by the UKIP leader.

The provocative show, described as a “mockumentary,” sparked intense debates on social media before, after and during the broadcast.

The short film depicts UKIP winning a slim majority in May’s general election, resulting in Britain’s economic and civil collapses three months later.

The “what if” drama contains an assortment of actual news footage, including RT reports, and acted scenes.

It suggests a UKIP government would quickly lead to strikes and race riots in Britain.

It illustrates an exodus of businesses as a result of Britain leaving the EU, causing mass unemployment. The “mockumentary” also depicts “un-British, aggressive and brutal” immigration raids, as the government cracks down on illegal migration.

The docudrama follows the story of a fictional UKIP MP, Deepa Kaur, who early on is seen smoking in a pub during a meeting with journalists, suggesting the smoking ban would be lifted if UKIP came to power.

Media watchdog Ofcom confirmed it had received “objections” to the program, as viewers accused the creators of being “politically biased.”

Ofcom said it had received nearly 1,000 complaints, making it one of the most “controversial” one-off shows in years.

Channel 4 has been accused of “attacking” the political party with “biased” portrayals in the lead-up to May’s general election.

The broadcaster’s head of documentaries, Nick Mirsky, said the drama showed UKIP to be having “a bit of a bumpy ride.

Mirsky argues the drama was “fair” and that the timing was “not an issue.”

He said “the film did not have to be politically balanced,” as it was being shown outside the election campaign period.

Our job is to reflect and explore contemporary British life. Nothing represents what’s different and unique in British political life now more than the rise of UKIP,” he said.

This might be what you wake up to after May 7,” he added.

Many on social media have criticized Channel 4 for their “biased representations” of the political party.

A Twitter user accused the broadcaster of being a “sicker version of the BBC.”

Amateurish fifth form propaganda from Channel 4. They’ve lost a bit of credibility tonight,” another Twitter user said.

A Twitter user told RT he “avoids watching propaganda CH4,” he branded them as “disgusting and uninformed (at all levels)” and suggests they should “lose their broadcasting license.”

Another Twitter user told RT he believes the film had “an element of truth of what can happen” if UKIP win in May.

A UKIP supporter told RT she is thankful for the film as it is “keeping UKIP in the media eye.”

Also speaking to RT, a non-UKIP supporter called the film “unfair and biased anti-UKIP propaganda,” and questioned whether Channel 4 would demonize other political parties.

This tweet echoed the sentiments of the film: “We fear for an uncomfortable and racist UKIP future,” they said.