Affairs of state? Tony Blair ‘breaks into sweat’ over alleged relationship with Murdoch’s wife

Affairs of state? Tony Blair ‘breaks into sweat’ over alleged relationship with Murdoch’s wife
Tony Blair says he will “never” discuss the true nature of his relationship with Rupert Murdoch’s ex-wife, Wendi Deng. The media mogul filed for divorce in June 2013 amid speculation the former prime minister had been having an affair.

Middle East envoy Blair became irked when questioned on the subject, banging “his coffee cup so loudly into its saucer that it spills and everyone in the room jumps,” according to an interviewer for The Economist.

Godfather to one of the former couple’s daughters, Blair has always denied the sordid allegation. He told the magazine it is “not something I will ever talk about— I haven’t and I won’t.”

When asked whether he found himself in a tangle over his friendship with Deng, the Economist reported that “a large, dark pool of sweat has suddenly appeared under his armpit, spreading across an expensive blue shirt.”

Murdoch spoke publicly about the end of his third marriage for the first time in April.

In an interview with Fortune magazine, he said he was “shocked” when he read Deng’s alleged diary entries about other men.

Rupert Murdoch, chairman and CEO of News Corporation, with ex-wife Wendi Deng.(Reuters / Lucy Nicholson)

Deng described her passion for Blair in a private note which was revealed by Vanity Fair in March.

“He has such a good body and he has really, really good legs… And he is slim, tall and [has] good skin. Pierc[ing] blue eyes which I love. Love his eyes. Also I love his power on the stage,” wrote Deng.

Murdoch filed for divorce a week after staff at his California ranch told him of their suspicions.

“I was in Australia. When I got back, I naturally asked the staff, and it opened up. That's the story. And then, you know, a week later I filed. As soon as I could find a lawyer,” Murdoch said.

Blair and the press magnate fell out soon after the divorce was filed.

“According to sources at NewsCorp, Mr Murdoch pressed the ‘mute’ button during a confrontational phone call, informed colleagues that he was getting ‘politicians’ answers’ to his questions, and has never spoken to Mr Blair since,” The Economist said.

If Blair was uncooperative when asked about his relationship with Deng, he was defiant when asked about Iraq.

He denied responsibility for the instability and violence ravaging swathes of the Middle East, saying he would not concede “until my dying day” he was wrong to remove Saddam Hussein.

“What annoys people is my refusal to change my mind. I don’t shut up about it and I know that strikes some people as provocative,” Blair said.

ICYMI