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We’re taking every-thong! Ukrainian bailiffs confiscate women’s PANTIES for Ministry of Justice auction to pay down debts

We’re taking every-thong! Ukrainian bailiffs confiscate women’s PANTIES for Ministry of Justice auction to pay down debts
Officials in the Ukrainian city of Krivoy Rog are sticking tightly to their briefs, going to extraordinary lengths to recover debts from those who owe money by seizing underwear to auction off online to eager bidders.

A surprise job lot uploaded last week to the CETAM website, set up for the sale of confiscated property by the country’s Ministry of Justice, consists of one pair of women’s underwear.

Officials describe the item as “green in color, with a black pattern.” The waistband is on the generous side, carrying an “extra-large” label.

Also on rt.com World Bank ranks Ukraine as one of the poorest nations in Europe & beyond

Any would-be buyers will be reassured to know that the knickers still have their tags attached, meaning they are unlikely to have been worn by their previous owner. And, with bidding opening at just $0.04, shrewd buyers can scoop a bargain courtesy of the Ukrainian government.

This is not the first listing on Kiev’s bailiff’s portal that has raised eyebrows. In May last year, authorities seized a Pit Bull Terrier from a debtor and put it up for sale. The five-year-old hound came complete with a veterinary passport and assurances he had received all his vaccinations.

In 2019, the World Bank ranked Ukraine as one of the poorest nations in Europe, and worse off than a number of countries in Central Asia. The agency’s research placed it around the same level as Moldova, Armenia, and Georgia, adding that it would take more than half a century to reach income levels seen in modern-day Poland.

A series of grants and loans from Western European nations was recently held up amid concerns of endemic corruption, and President Volodymyr Zelensky has fought a pitched battle over constitutional reforms aimed at holding officials accountable for pocketing illicit cash.

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