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‘Loonies’ taking over asylum? Alternative UK parties gain momentum

The UK’s traditional three-party system seems to be fading – and non-mainstream rivals are ready to take center stage. For many, support for alternative parties is seen as a way to protest against the nation’s current political landscape.

Last week’s bi-election in Eastleigh saw 14 unconventional parties racing for the win. The UK Independence Party – a group which David Cameron once described as a “bunch of fruitcakes, loonies, and closet racists” – managed to push the Conservatives into third place.

Some say it’s a sign that voters are disillusioned and ready for change.

“People often talk of the protest vote like it’s a bad thing. Let’s face it – there’s a lot to protest about right now,” the leader of the Pirate Party, Loz Kaye, told RT.

For more on the shifting shape of British politics, watch Sara Firth’s report.

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