Russian teenagers take to Freerun

Freerun / Parkour is a new fad sweeping Moscow. The physical activity of moving in the environment without letting any obstacles get in the way, it is becoming more and more popular among the younger generation in Russia.

Vaulting, jumping, somersaulting, and more – that is what a future stylist, banker, journalist, and two IT specialists are practicing, and not one of them is older than twenty.

Danila is eighteen years old. He says freerun has turned his life upside down.

“I have been practicing freerun for three years. When I started, my life changed completely. We are all against drugs. I used to be stupid before and did stupid things,” said Danila, a freerunner.

Armen Guloyan is the President of the Russian Association of Freerun.

And even though he is in charge, there is no pressure on what members should do.

“I never tell them they do anything wrong. Everyone should have his own style because freerun is a free discipline, it is the art of movement and it is a way of looking at life. And everyone has his own way,” Armen Guloyan supposes.

They say the main rule in this activity is never to attempt anything unless you're a hundred percent sure you can do it.

It is not sport, but creative philosophy.

The activity has been attracting the attention of the youngest boys as well.

Mark and Vladik try to attend as many work-outs as possible.

“We also practice freerun. And we would like to become real professionals, so we come here to watch the guys do it and learn from them,” the boys claimed.

Freerun can be practiced by anyone, anywhere and at any time. And if you manage to master it, it does not only become a physical activity, but also an art.