Robin Hood op: Anonymous, Poison target the 1%

Screenshot of the video statement on Operation Robin Hood
Two hacker groups, the hactivists Anonymous and Team Poison, which made headlines by cracking a UN server, have joined forces to steal from the banks and give to the charities.

­“Operation Robin Hood is going to return the money to those who have been cheated by our system and most importantly to those hurt by our banks. Operation Robin Hood will take credit cards and donate to the 99 per cent, as well as various charities around the globe,” the duo said in a YouTube video statement.

The idea apparently relies on stealing personal data of credit card holders and using, just like your regular cyber criminals do, and distribute it to the poor instead of pocketing it. The collaboration, which calls itself Poisanon, believes that the banks will be forced to reimburse the damages caused by the hack and thus will be the ones to pay.

“We are going to make the banks deliver your money back to you with a smile on their faces and hate in their heart,” the statement assures.

Both groups have taken credit for several high-profile attacks on computer networks in the past, which may imply that they have the capability to do what they promise to do. Team Poison said it carried out the hacking of a UN server and stealing logins and passwords of the international organization’s employees.

Anonymous is mostly famous for politically-motivated attacks on organizations and individuals, which they believe violate individual freedoms, the latter including online piracy, according to the group’s beliefs. The latest reported victim of their action was Lt. John Pike, the police officer who pepper-sprayed unresisting protesters during the crackdown on the UC Davis demonstration.