icon bookmark-bicon bookmarkicon cameraicon checkicon chevron downicon chevron lefticon chevron righticon chevron upicon closeicon v-compressicon downloadicon editicon v-expandicon fbicon fileicon filtericon flag ruicon full chevron downicon full chevron lefticon full chevron righticon full chevron upicon gpicon insicon mailicon moveicon-musicicon mutedicon nomutedicon okicon v-pauseicon v-playicon searchicon shareicon sign inicon sign upicon stepbackicon stepforicon swipe downicon tagicon tagsicon tgicon trashicon twicon vkicon yticon wticon fm

Sudan to join White House-brokered peace deal with Israel after call with US

Sudan to join White House-brokered peace deal with Israel after call with US
Sudan is joining the Abraham Accords and recognizing the state of Israel, US President Donald Trump has announced. It is the third country in three months to do so, following the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain.

Following a phone call with Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu and Trump on Friday, Sudanese PM Abdalla Hamdok and head of the Sovereignty Council Abdel Fattah al-Burhan announced they would “end the state of belligerence” with Israel and start the process of normalizing relations.

White House deputy press secretary Judd Deere called it “another major step toward building peace in the Middle East.” 

Friday’s action is also symbolic, as it was in Khartoum that the Arab League adopted its 1967 resolution declaring “no peace with Israel, no recognition of Israel, no negotiations with Israel” as its guiding principle. 

Also on rt.com WATCH: Bahrain, UAE and Israel sign ‘Abraham Accords’ peace deal at the White House

Sudan is the third country in three months to join what the Trump administration has termed the Abraham Accords, signed on September 15 at the White House between Israel, the UAE, and Bahrain – with hopes that more countries will eventually join in. It was the first Middle East peace deal since 1994, when Jordan first recognized Israel.

Earlier this week, Trump announced that the US would be removing Sudan from the list of state sponsors of terrorism, as soon as the North African country pays out $335 million in compensation to victims of Al-Qaeda attacks on US embassies. The designation dates back to 1993, early in the 30-year rule of President Omar al-Bashir.

After al-Bashir was deposed last year in a military coup, the Sovereignty Council was established to lead a transitional government. The majority-Muslim nation also went from being governed by Islamic law to being an officially secular state.

Also on rt.com US’ planned removal of Sudan from terrorism list is really an attempt to reduce Chinese influence and further isolate Iran

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

Dear readers and commenters,

We have implemented a new engine for our comment section. We hope the transition goes smoothly for all of you. Unfortunately, the comments made before the change have been lost due to a technical problem. We are working on restoring them, and hoping to see you fill up the comment section with new ones. You should still be able to log in to comment using your social-media profiles, but if you signed up under an RT profile before, you are invited to create a new profile with the new commenting system.

Sorry for the inconvenience, and looking forward to your future comments,

RT Team.

Podcasts