icon bookmark-bicon bookmarkicon cameraicon checkicon chevron downicon chevron lefticon chevron righticon chevron upicon closeicon v-compressicon downloadicon editicon v-expandicon fbicon fileicon filtericon flag ruicon full chevron downicon full chevron lefticon full chevron righticon full chevron upicon gpicon insicon mailicon moveicon-musicicon mutedicon nomutedicon okicon v-pauseicon v-playicon searchicon shareicon sign inicon sign upicon stepbackicon stepforicon swipe downicon tagicon tagsicon tgicon trashicon twicon vkicon yticon wticon fm

WATCH: Lebanese citizens vent their ire by TORCHING bank, army vehicle, as at least 1 protester shot dead

WATCH: Lebanese citizens vent their ire by TORCHING bank, army vehicle, as at least 1 protester shot dead
A protester has been shot and killed in the Lebanese city of Tripoli, as the country’s financial and economic crisis worsens under the additional pressure of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Lebanese pound has collapsed amid soaring inflation and unemployment worsened by the shutdown of the economy, exacerbating the pre-existing financial crisis which has plagued the country since October.

As protesters became increasingly angry, soldiers fired warning shots into the air, before using tear gas and rubber bullets to disperse the crowds. The violence only escalated from there, as soldiers faced off against protesters and rioters, ultimately shooting dead one young man in his 20s. 

The soldiers claim they were bombarded with fire bombs and a grenade, in an engagement during which two soldiers were lightly injured. Eyewitness video from the scene purports to show the army vehicles ablaze.

Several banks were attacked as the protesters vented their ire at the country's economic apocalypse. At least one bank was set on fire, as eyewitness footage from the scene shows.

The country's banking association has shuttered all banks in Tripoli until security can be re-established in the city, after the targeted “serious attacks and rioting” put bank employees’ lives in harm’s way.

Lebanon's banks have been the go-to targets of protester frustration since anti-government demonstrations began last October, as people have been frozen out from accessing their savings.

Also on rt.com Lebanon defaults on its $1.2bn Eurobond debt, PM says corruption ‘has eaten the state’

The pound has lost more than half its value since the financial and economic crisis began, with the coronavirus pandemic only adding insult to injury in an already tense and volatile situation.

Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!

Dear readers and commenters,

We have implemented a new engine for our comment section. We hope the transition goes smoothly for all of you. Unfortunately, the comments made before the change have been lost due to a technical problem. We are working on restoring them, and hoping to see you fill up the comment section with new ones. You should still be able to log in to comment using your social-media profiles, but if you signed up under an RT profile before, you are invited to create a new profile with the new commenting system.

Sorry for the inconvenience, and looking forward to your future comments,

RT Team.

Podcasts