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Chinese hotel used as Covid-19 quarantine site COLLAPSES, trapping dozens under rubble (VIDEOS)

Chinese hotel used as Covid-19 quarantine site COLLAPSES, trapping dozens under rubble (VIDEOS)
A hotel has collapsed in the southeastern Chinese city of Quanzhou, burying dozens of people under the rubble. The building was used as a quarantine site for the deadly Covid-19 coronavirus victims.

LATEST: VIDEOS show aftermath of Covid-19 quarantine hotel collapse in China as rescuers search for dozens trapped under rubble

Footage from the scene showed the building reduced to rubble and emergency services searching the debris. So far, at least 49 people have reportedly been rescued.

Xinjia Hotel building abruptly crumpled on Saturday evening. According to local media, at least 70 people have been trapped under the hotel's remains. No information on potential casualties was immediately available and the cause of the collapse remains unclear.

Around 700 rescue workers and firefighters, as well as dozens of emergency vehicles have been dispatched to the scene to comb through the ruins of the hotel and search for survivors.

Several Chinese media outlets have suggested that the five-story building was used as a quarantine site, housing people potentially infected with Covid-19 amid the coronavirus outbreak.

Over 100,000 cases of the dreaded coronavirus, including almost 3,500 deaths, have been registered globally, with a vast majority of them in China, from where the virus originated. So far, nearly 60,000 affected people have made a recovery.

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