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‘Why don’t you die?’ Man on spider-slaying quest triggers police operation in Australia

‘Why don’t you die?’ Man on spider-slaying quest triggers police operation in Australia
A full-scale police operation was triggered in Australia after neighbors sounded the alarm over a man shouting death threats at his home. Police were a bit surprised, though, when they arrived to tackle the ‘threat’.

The bizarre incident unfolded in the suburbs of the western Australian city of Perth on Wednesday morning, when a person called the police on his neighbors.

The witness overheard a man repeatedly shouting “Why don’t you die?” while a toddler was crying. The spouse of the screaming man, however, was silent, which further fueled grim suspicions on what might have been happening in the apartment.

The scare prompted a response from numerous officers. Wanneroo Police then revealed what happened next, posting the responders’ log on Twitter, and deleting it later.

Instead of domestic violence, they found that a hot-blooded murder had taken place, as the man had bravely slain a home-invading arachnid. The shouting and loud death threats were caused by the man’s “serious fear of spiders.”

“No injuries sighted (except for spider). No further police involvement required,” the police log read. The size and type of the home-invader was also not disclosed.

Australia is not an easy place for an arachnophobe to live. It is home to a whole galaxy of spiders, including extremely venomous species – and extremely large ones, with some reaching leg spans of a whopping 30cm.

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