‘No whining!’ Pope Francis hangs warning sign on door to deter complainers

‘No whining!’ Pope Francis hangs warning sign on door to deter complainers
Pope Francis has made his opinion on complainers very clear, posting a ‘No Whining’ sign on the door to his Vatican residence. It goes on to stress that the “penalty” is worsened if done in front of children.

Underneath the ‘No Whining’ warning is a description of the typical symptoms experienced by those who choose to complain all the time.

“Violators are subject to a syndrome of always feeling like a victim and the consequent reduction of your sense of humor and capacity to solve problems,” the sign states in Italian, as quoted by Reuters.

It goes on to state that “the penalty is doubled if the violation take[s] place in the presence of children. To get the best out of yourself, concentrate on your potential and not on your limitations.

“Stop complaining and take steps to improve your life," it concludes.

The sign was given to Pope Francis by Italian psychologist and self-help author Salvo Noe on June 14 as he greeted the pontiff after an audience in St. Peter's Square.

“I will put it outside my office door where I receive people,” Francis said to Noe, who also gave the pontiff a book and a bracelet, according to La Stampa. 

However, Pope Francis ultimately hung the sign outside the door of his apartment, rather than inside the grand Apostolic Palace, which houses his office.

The sign was initially photographed by an elderly Italian priest who was visiting the pontiff, and posted online by Vatican Insider.

Its presence was confirmed to Reuters by the website's editor-in-chief Andrea Tornielli, an author who is close to Francis. 

Pope Francis, who often makes headlines for breaking the traditional pontiff mold, previously stated that a sense of humor is incredibly important, and that he prays for it every day.

“A sense of humor is a gift I ask for every day. Because a sense of humor lifts you up, it shows your life is short and to take things in the spirit of a redeemer,” the pontiff said in a television interview with TV2000 in November.

“It’s a human attribute, but it’s the closest to God’s grace.”