#IranDeal as seen online: New horizons or impending Apocalypse?

Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif talks to journalists as he stands on the balcony of Palais Coburg, the venue for nuclear talks, Austria (Reuters/Leonhard Foeger)
With #IranDeal one of the top trending topics on Twitter on Tuesday, opinions of both politicians and thousands of social network users split as of whether the hard-reached nuclear agreement is a victory of democracy or the beginning of the end.

READ MORE: Key points of historic nuclear deal reached by Iran and 6 world powers

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif's post ahead of the official announcement of the deal is among the most popular #IranDeal tweets. The Iranian official called the result of the years-long talks a "triumph of diplomacy."

The deal was also praised by his president, Hassan Rouhani, who called the previous years of standoff between Iran and the West an "unnecessary crisis."

Iranians massively followed the official Iranian line, celebrating the "new horizons" with excitement, singing and honking horns in the streets.

While Western officials involved in the talks were also "applauding" the "historic" agreement and taking “happy family” pictures, some people protested in Vienna, chanting "bad deal!" outside the talks’ venue. The group reportedly included tourists from Atlanta and some Israelis.

Probably the fiercest opponent of the deal, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the "historic" deal was a "historic mistake."

"When you are ready to make an agreement at any price - this is the result. With the first reports it can be already determined that this agreement is another historic mistake," Netanyahu wrote in Hebrew.

To make his point even clearer for wider target audiences, Netanyahu’s office added Persian to the mix of several languages it already tweets in. One of the first posts on the Twitter feed in Farsi restated the point that #IranDeal would pave the way for Tehran to get "atomic bomb and billions of dollars for terrorism."

Israeli leader of a right-wing religious party versus the founder and current president of the National Iranian American Council...

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#IranDeal has yet to be reviewed and approved by Congress, with US President Barack Obama likely to run into significant difficulties in winning such approval, as both Republican and Democrat members have aired skepticism. Some Americans say the congressional decision might be the last chance in saving the world from a nuclear end.

But President Rouhani has repeatedly said Iran has never "sought to manufacture a nuclear weapon," and will never do so. "The whole world knows very well that manufacturing a nuclear bomb ... is considered forbidden," he said on Tuesday in a TV address following the deal's announcement.

With all the opposing opinions, one thing with #IranDeal is for sure - the online world does care.