Koran? Grandparents? Suicide mission? Al Qaeda’s job application questions for jihadists revealed

Reuters / Khalil Ashawi
What are your objectives in jihad? Do you know the Koran by heart? And… would you like to be a suicide bomber? These and a dozen other questions are on Al-Qaeda’s application form, documents seized by the US in Osama Bin Laden’s compound reveal.

On Wednesday, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence released a list of English-language material recovered during the raid in Abbottabad, Pakistan in 2011, when the then-Al-Qaeda leader was killed. One of the documents, dubbed “Instructions to Applicants,” proved to be an application form for a potential terrorist.

The form, translated from Arabic into English by the US government, demands family information as far back as grandparents and an applicant’s date of arrival “in the land of jihad.”

How long do you plan to stay in the (jihadi) theater?” What objectives would you would like to accomplish on your jihad path?” are just a few items on the three-page long list.

Al-Qaeda asks its future warriors “how much of the holy Koran” they have memorized. Future extremists are also to provide the details of all their passports, even their fake ones.

Do you wish to execute a suicide operation? Who should we contact in case you become a martyr?” the list continues.

In the meantime, the extremist group that has claimed numerous terror attacks across the world is still interested in the hobbies of its aspiring recruits.

READ MORE: Bin Laden’s will revealed: Interest in Illuminati, 9/11 conspiracy theories

What is your favorite material: science or literature?” asks the form.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence also made public the contents of more than 100 personal documents that were said to have belonged to the Al-Qaeda leader, including letters to family members and allies. Among the items found in the compound there were at least 75 publicly available US government reports and digital e-books, computer manuals, religious documents and think tank studies, the office said.

Reportedly, there were also more than a dozen items related to France or the French economy, including factsheets and a list of French shipping companies, and books on the Illuminati and 9/11 conspiracy theories, such as Bloodlines of the Illuminati and The New Pearl Harbor: Disturbing Questions About the Bush Administration and 9/11.