US agenda on Israel is not one of peace - author

According to writer William Engdahl, the global community is now witnessing the most significant change in US-Israeli relations since the recognition of the Israeli state.

­As tense talks took place at the White House, Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu rejected Barack Obama's call for peace with the Palestinians based on the country’s 1967 borders. And the US president admitted there were differences between the views.

Obama stated overtly for the first time that the peace talks should be based on a future Palestinian state within the borders in place before the 1967 Middle East War. Netanyahu flatly rejected this proposal, saying Israel wanted "a peace that will be genuine".

“The US agenda is not the agenda that Barack Obama claims it to be, the one of peace. I think we are in the midst of the most profound shift in Israeli-Washington relations since 1948’s recognition of the Israeli state,” said William Engdahl, writer.

Engdahl believes the invariable confidence of US-Israeli relations has been shattered by the wave of revolutions that flared up in North Africa several months ago.

“The basis of trust relationships between Israel and Washington is being drastically challenged by the US support of these destabilizations from Egypt, Tunisia, Libya and the entire Middle East since the end of 2010. It has created a tremendous sense in Israel of insecurity. And the stability they thought they had suddenly looked very unstable. So the nice words that Obama said window-dressing the content is one of continued tensions between Israel and Washington under the guise of so-called peace,” Engdahl maintained.