Unipolar world unacceptable – Russian FM

Russia's Foreign Minister has used an appearance at the UN General Assembly to lash out at the world's unipolar security system controlled by the U.S. Referring to the recent conflict in South Ossetia, Sergey Lavrov said

He also said all talk about the territorial integrity of Georgia after its aggression against South Ossetia has become senseless.

“The bombings of sleeping Tskhinval and the killing of peaceful citizens and peacekeepers put an end to the territorial integrity of Georgia,” said Lavrov.

“Now this issue is closed. The future of the peoples of Abkhazia and South Ossetia is effectively protected by the agreements between Moscow and Sukhum and Tskhinval,” he added.

Lavrov also called for an analyse of the Caucasus crisis in terms of its consequences not only for the region but for the whole world.

“The existing security architecture in Europe did not pass the test of the latest events. Attempts to adjust this architecture to the laws of unipolarity made it unable to curb the aggressor and prevent supplies of offensive weapons to it despite the existing codes of conduct,” he said.

Sergey Lavrov urged the international community to confirm their commitment to the United Nations as the only legitimate international body.

“The Cold War distorted the nature of international relations and turned them into an arena for ideological confrontation,” said Lavrov.

“Only now that it is over the UN, created on the basis of a polycentric vision of the world, can use its potential in full,” he said.

‘Tired of playing a static role’

Lavrov also criticised the unipolar security system in the world. He said U.S. missile defence ambitions, as well as NATO expansion, are America's attempts to be the boss:

“The inertia of unipolar world ideology also revealed itself in other spheres of international life, including unilateral steps on AMD and militarization of outer space, attempts to bypass the parity in arms control regimes, enlargement of political and military blocs, and politicization of the issues of access to energy resources and their transit”.

The United States is involved in two wars that are killing millions. It has been hit hard by a financial crisis resulting from bad choices within the country. However, few would argue that America still considers itself to be the messenger of truth.

The U.S. always has a harsh word or two up its sleeve and is never reluctant to lash out, especially when it comes to Russia. And one has to wonder – how long until one voice continues to attempt to influence the rest of the world.

Russia says “enough is enough” – the United States has to work with other countries.

“In order to control a totally new situation as it evolved after 9/11, instead of required genuine co-operative effort, including joint analysis and co-ordination of practical steps, the mechanisms intended for a unipolar world started to be used, meaning that all decisions were to be taken in a single centre while the rest just had to follow,” Lavrov said.

To watch the powerful message from Russia please follow the link.

Saturday’s speech of Russia’s Foreign Minister follows addresses by U.S. President George Bush and French President Nicolas Sarkozy earlier in the week.

George Bush spoke for the last time as U.S. President. He criticised Russia for its actions during the conflict in South Ossetia, adding that Washington will continue to support Georgia.

As for Sarkozy, speaking on the recent violence in South Ossetia, he stressed the EU can't compromise when it comes to the sovereignty of states.

No sanctions against Iran

Meanwhile, the Russian message was not the only spotlight at the UN on Saturday. The Security Council has adopted a new resolution on Iran. The text is sanction-free, it calls upon Iran to follow the three previous resolutions passed by the Security Council.

The goal of the resolution is to show that the Security Council is united in one stance when it comes to Iran's nuclear programme.

The President of Iran spoke at the UN General Assembly on Tuesday. Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said his country had a right to peaceful nuclear energy and was being bullied through political and economic pressure.